1920's? Logging, Back In The Olden Days

Discussion in 'Decades' started by Yvonne Smith, Apr 15, 2016.

  1. Yvonne Smith

    Yvonne Smith Senior Staff
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    I belong to a Facebook group about north Idaho, and people post their old photos there, plus ones from some of the historical museums.
    I am not sure of the date for this picture, but someone said the logging truck is a C-Cab Model T; so I am guessing that the 1920's would be somewhere close to the right time period.

    This picture is amazing when you really look at it ! The log is HUGE, it is not even tied onto the truck in any way, just (somehow ?) laid on top of wood blocks.
    The whole bridge across the canyon is made of log, and even the road across the top that the truck is driving on is only logs laid side-by-side.
    These guys had to be not only tough as nails; but way, way brave, too ! !

    image.jpeg
     
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  2. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Senior Staff
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    That is an amazing photo!
     
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  3. Frank Sanoica

    Frank Sanoica Veteran Member
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    Incredible! And, looks dangerous, for sure! In Missouri where we lived in the Ozarks, 1999-2012, logging is just about the only industry. Locally, they call trees being felled "widow-makers". In the past year two experienced loggers, both able-bodied, husky young men, one of whom I knew very well, really decent guy, were killed in logging accidents. The guy I knew, Matt, was crushed to death between two trucks, on an incline, where brakes had been inadequately set. His little girl would now be about 6 or 7, hardly knew her Daddy. Frank
     
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  4. Joe Riley

    Joe Riley Veteran Member
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    Great picture, Yvonne! Here's one that like.
    [​IMG]
    Steam train on the Columbia and Nehalem Valley Railroad
     
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  5. Frank Sanoica

    Frank Sanoica Veteran Member
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    Imagine going to the trouble of building such a span, in rugged terrain! Seems as less flat ground with trees left on it was available, such effort became necessary.
     
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  6. Nancy Hart

    Nancy Hart Veteran Member
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    Not a bridge, but has to do with logging.

    Team of oxen on a skid road at Hastings Sawmill Camp, Vancouver, BC [ca 1890] .. LARGER IMAGE

    Vancouver bc skid road.jpg

    I like the roof on that building. Not quite finished, but good enough. :cool:
     
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  7. Nancy Hart

    Nancy Hart Veteran Member
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    Donkey engine at end of skid road built on top of a log trestle, Wynooche Timber Company, near Montesano, ca. 1921

    Donkey_engdonkey engine.jpeg

    A steam powered "donkey engine"

    [​IMG]
     
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  8. Patsy Faye

    Patsy Faye Veteran Member
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    Love that picture !
     
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  9. Faye Fox

    Faye Fox Very Well-Known Member
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    Frank
    Trees being felled with a broken hanging high branch
    are called widow makers, because of a dislodging chance
    If the feller can't get out of the danger zone
    chances there will be a widow waiting at home
    Faye
    dscn0498.jpg
     
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  10. Holly Saunders

    Holly Saunders Veteran Member
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    Even after 3 years this thread is worth seeing again, just for the pictures...
     
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  11. Bess Barber

    Bess Barber Very Well-Known Member
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    Funny how so many people, including myself, have complained about their job. These men didn't have Workman Compensation, hour lunches or holiday / sick pay. They seriously just had to WORK and find their own solutions. It's admirable.
     
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  12. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Senior Staff
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  13. Beth Gallagher

    Beth Gallagher Veteran Member
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    I was just saying something like this to my husband earlier. There was some snowflake on TV complaining about his "work/life balance" and I wanted to throw my shoe at the screen. So much WHINING nowadays from people who don't know what real work is.
     
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  14. Faye Fox

    Faye Fox Very Well-Known Member
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    Any of you ladies ever do any chainsaw work? I guess it is becoming a thing with some young ladies these days. Mainly to do logging contest, but a few are professional lumberjills. A couple years ago after many years of not having or needing a chainsaw, I bought a small battery operated chainsaw to do sculpture wood carving. I did that and lost interest. Back in the day, I fell all the logs and trees I sawed into lumber for my little log cabin in the mountains. I took on a job one fall with a small logging company cutting near my mountain home. I loved being a faller for 3 months, but hated being a knot bumper on the landing. Being a small father and son company, I fell the trees and the father and son skidded them to the landing area. Then we all removed limbs (knot bumping) and loaded them on their logging truck that the sons wife drove. Logging jobs that I didn't work on long were choker setter for heli-logging after snow and cold set in. Working under those rotors was cold! Other logging jobs I refused to work on, were line logging. No thank you! Some old photos of ladies and logs.

    0db62da89e1d8133696435204f314557--army-girls-land-girls.jpg 69a21811ecb2ff5510cbfe7bd9bace5e.jpg View attachment 31489
     
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    Last edited: Oct 25, 2019
  15. Faye Fox

    Faye Fox Very Well-Known Member
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    During WW 2 women did most of the home front jobs.
    I honor each and ever one for their service to their countries.
    default.jpg de9ac91b5a97b4b26060e3c0cb88a2a2.jpg 426f14352b2bc20cff2055154528fe59--ww-women-the-queen.jpg
     
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