Above Ground Garden

Discussion in 'Crops & Gardens' started by Hal Pollner, Jun 9, 2018.

  1. Hal Pollner

    Hal Pollner Very Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2018
    Messages:
    1,148
    Likes Received:
    891
    About 15 years ago I thought I would be a Real Farmer and grow vegetables (I don't call them ''veggies"), in an above-ground planting box.

    I built a heavy-duty box from 2 x 12 lumber with a perforated drainage floor, and then filled it with planting mix and planted my favorite vegetable: RADISHES!

    After months of tending to the plants, with regular watering and tending the soil, I produced a crop of stunted radishes.

    After that disappointment, I deeded the garden over to my Wife, who grows a variety of crops.

    Now, when I want radishes, I'll do what the smart people do: Go to your supermarket's Produce Section!

    (The photos show wife's crops)

    Hal
    152.JPG 332.JPG
     
    #1
    Last edited: Jun 9, 2018
    Don Alaska likes this.
  2. Holly Saunders

    Holly Saunders Veteran Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2015
    Messages:
    33,208
    Likes Received:
    10,414
    Lovely...that's exactly what I want.. to save me bending down to the ground , but I had this convo on another thread with @Don Alaska on the correct type of raised beds to use, particularly wooden ones which are coated in chemicals which leach into the soil ... Cedar is best but it's expensive ..cheaper way to do it is to used untreated wood and line with polyethylene
     
    #2
    Don Alaska likes this.
  3. Don Alaska

    Don Alaska Very Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2018
    Messages:
    1,652
    Likes Received:
    2,454
    That is a beautiful little bed, Hal. What is your wife growing?
     
    #3
  4. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Greeter
    Moderator Registered

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2015
    Messages:
    10,608
    Likes Received:
    14,593
    Nice planting bed, though. I have had similar experiences with most things that I have tried to grow here in Maine, although I did much better in California and Texas, given the elongated growing periods. My carrots are tiny, and my onions are sometimes not much bigger than they were when I planted them. Last years beans did pretty well, although we didn't plant enough of them to do anything with. I have done okay with radishes though, given that they require a very short growing season, and I've done alright with potatoes.
     
    #4
    Don Alaska likes this.
  5. Hal Pollner

    Hal Pollner Very Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2018
    Messages:
    1,148
    Likes Received:
    891
    I don't know...I'll have to ask her.

    H.P.
     
    #5
  6. Don Alaska

    Don Alaska Very Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2018
    Messages:
    1,652
    Likes Received:
    2,454
    We had similar problems, Ken. Much of it was cold soils, thus slow microbiome growth, and infertile soils as well as short, cool growing seasons. Onion sets did okay, but were mostly used as "scallions", but beets and carrots were very slow to mature. I developed my own natural fertilizer based on one formulated by Steve Solomon many years ago; it made a dramatic difference in our yields of carrots and beets, especially. I now start my onions from seed indoors in January, am particular about varieties suited to my latitude, and keep the plants trimmed to 4-5 inches until just before planting outside. Sometimes, much to the chagrin of organic growers, you must use chemical, water-soluble fertilizers (or fake organic ones) to get a good yield of some crops in cool/cold climates.
     
    #6
    Ken Anderson and Holly Saunders like this.
  7. Frank Sanoica

    Frank Sanoica Veteran Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2016
    Messages:
    5,976
    Likes Received:
    5,538
    Here where the sunlight is extremely intense due to very dry and clear air, above-ground containers having soil (and/or plants) in them become very hot; successful growing is near-impossible.
    Frank
     
    #7
    Yvonne Smith and Holly Saunders like this.
  8. Yvonne Smith

    Yvonne Smith Greeter
    Moderator Registered

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2015
    Messages:
    6,152
    Likes Received:
    9,264
    I have found that true here as well. We have a lot of heat in the summer, although not as hot as you would have out there in the high desert, @Frank Sanoica ; but still enough that it is a problem with container gardening.
    I am trying to put mine where they get more of the morning sun become it gets so hot, and then will be shaded from the blasting afternoon sunshine.
    I am also using some of the pine straw that we have in abundance and it does make a good mulch cover and helps to hold in the moisture and keep out some of the heat from the dirt.
     
    #8
    Frank Sanoica likes this.
  9. Don Alaska

    Don Alaska Very Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2018
    Messages:
    1,652
    Likes Received:
    2,454
    #9
    Last edited: Jun 9, 2018
    Frank Sanoica likes this.
  10. Frank Sanoica

    Frank Sanoica Veteran Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2016
    Messages:
    5,976
    Likes Received:
    5,538
    @Yvonne Smith
    The sun here is so unforgiving and constant that a box like @Hal Pollner showed will conduct heat in from it's perimeter construction and kill plant roots, most types, anyway. When we lived in Phoenix, which is a bit less relentless for heat, one newsman in summer daily tried to fry an egg on the sidewalk. Sometimes he just about succeeded! BTW, our area isn't high desert, as our elevation is only 550 ft. above sea level. The city of Yuma ius 200 miles to the south, altitude there (at Gulf) is zero ft., so therefore the Colorado River flowing by here drops 550 ft. in 200 miles of distance. That's what keeps it flowing. Downhill all the way, but no caca involved! Sparkling clean.
    Frank
     
    #10
  11. Von Jones

    Von Jones Veteran Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2015
    Messages:
    3,477
    Likes Received:
    2,171
    #11
    Frank Sanoica likes this.
  12. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Greeter
    Moderator Registered

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2015
    Messages:
    10,608
    Likes Received:
    14,593
    Surely, I ate them.
     
    #12
    Von Jones likes this.
  13. Hal Pollner

    Hal Pollner Very Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2018
    Messages:
    1,148
    Likes Received:
    891
    Yeah, I ate 'em.

    They were not as satisfying as good-size radishes, but with salt...they were OK.

    Hal
     
    #13
    Von Jones and Frank Sanoica like this.

Share This Page