Christian Hymns

Discussion in 'Faith & Religion' started by Ken Anderson, Jul 30, 2018.

  1. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Greeter
    Moderator Registered

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2015
    Messages:
    10,608
    Likes Received:
    14,593
    Often used as a doxology, this Christian hymn was written by Thomas Ken in 1674. His parents died while he was a child, so he was raised by a half-sister and her husband, who enrolled him at Winchester College, a boarding school that was more like what we (in the United States) would think of as a junior/senior high school. Later, Thomas was ordained into the ministry and returned to Winchester College as a chaplain.

    In 1674, he wrote three short hymns intended to encourage the devotional habits of the boys. At this time, English-language hymns were not used in worship services. Only the Psalms were sung in publish worship. Thomas Ken suggested them to be used privately, in their rooms.

    One was to be sung in the morning, upon waking, another at bedtime, and the third at midnight if one was still awake.

    All three of the hymns ended with a common stanza, which has become one of the most widely-sung verse in the Christian world, used as a doxology in many churches:

    Praise God, from whom all blessings flow;
    Praise Him, all creatures here below;
    Praise Him above, ye heavenly host;
    Praise Father, Son, and Holy Ghost.


    In 1680, Thomas Ken was appointed a chaplain to King Charles II of England, which was a difficult job since Charles kept a string of mistresses. It is said that the king once asked Ken to lodge one of his mistresses in the chaplain's residence, to which he replied, "Not for the King's Kingdom." Afterward, the king referred to him as "that little man who refused lodging to poor Nellie."

    James II, the next king, imprisoned him in the Tower of London because he refused to sign James' Declaration of Indulgence. Acquitted, he retired in the home of a wealthy friend until his death in 1711 His Doxology was sung at his funeral.

    Awake, My Soul, And With The Sun (morning hymn)

    Awake, my soul, and with the sun
    Thy daily stage of duty run;
    Shake off dull sloth, and joyful rise,
    To pay thy morning sacrifice.

    Thy precious time misspent, redeem,
    Each present day thy last esteem,
    Improve thy talent with due care;
    For the great day thyself prepare.

    By influence of the Light divine
    Let thy own light to others shine.
    Reflect all Heaven’s propitious ways
    In ardent love, and cheerful praise.

    In conversation be sincere;
    Keep conscience as the noontide clear;
    Think how all seeing God thy ways
    And all thy secret thoughts surveys.

    Wake, and lift up thyself, my heart,
    And with the angels bear thy part,
    Who all night long unwearied sing
    High praise to the eternal King.

    All praise to Thee, who safe has kept
    And hast refreshed me while I slept
    Grant, Lord, when I from death shall wake
    I may of endless light partake.

    Heav’n is, dear Lord, where’er Thou art,
    O never then from me depart;
    For to my soul ’tis hell to be
    But for one moment void of Thee.

    Lord, I my vows to Thee renew;
    Disperse my sins as morning dew.
    Guard my first springs of thought and will,
    And with Thyself my spirit fill.

    Direct, control, suggest, this day,
    All I design, or do, or say,
    That all my powers, with all their might,
    In Thy sole glory may unite.

    I would not wake nor rise again
    And Heaven itself I would disdain,
    Wert Thou not there to be enjoyed,
    And I in hymns to be employed.

    Praise God, from whom all blessings flow;
    Praise Him, all creatures here below;
    Praise Him above, ye heavenly host;
    Praise Father, Son, and Holy Ghost.


    All Praise To Thee, My God, This Night (bedtime hymn)

    All praise to Thee, my God, this night,
    For all the blessings of the light!
    Keep me, O keep me, King of kings,
    Beneath Thine own almighty wings.

    Forgive me, Lord, for Thy dear Son,
    The ill that I this day have done,
    That with the world, myself, and Thee,
    I, ere I sleep, at peace may be.

    Teach me to live, that I may dread
    The grave as little as my bed.
    Teach me to die, that so I may
    Rise glorious at the judgment day.

    O may my soul on Thee repose,
    And with sweet sleep mine eyelids close,
    Sleep that may me more vigorous make
    To serve my God when I awake.

    When in the night I sleepless lie,
    My soul with heavenly thoughts supply;
    Let no ill dreams disturb my rest,
    No powers of darkness me molest.

    O when shall I, in endless day,
    For ever chase dark sleep away,
    And hymns divine with angels sing,
    All praise to Thee, eternal King?

    Praise God, from whom all blessings flow;
    Praise Him, all creatures here below;
    Praise Him above, ye heavenly host;
    Praise Father, Son, and Holy Ghost.


    My God, Now I From Sleep Awake (midnight hymn)

    Blest angels, while we silent lie,
    Your hallelujahs sing on high;
    You joyful hymn the ever-blest,
    Before the throne, and never rest.

    I with your choir celestial join,
    In offering up a hymn divine;
    With you in Heav’n I hope to dwell,
    And bid the night and world farewell.

    My soul, when I shake off this dust,
    Lord, in Thy arms I will entrust;
    O make me Thy peculiar care,
    Some mansion for my soul prepare.

    Give me a place at Thy saints’ feet,
    Or some fall’n angel’s vacant seat;
    I’ll strive to sing as loud as they,
    Who sit above in brighter day.

    O may I always ready stand,
    With my lamp burning in my hand;
    May I in sight of Heav’n rejoice,
    Whene’er I hear the Bridegroom’s voice.

    All praise to Thee, in light arrayed,
    Who light Thy dwelling place hast made:
    A boundless ocean of bright beams
    From Thy all glorious Godhead streams.

    Blest Jesus, Thou on Heav’n intent,
    Whole nights hast in devotion spent;
    But I, frail creature, soon am tired,
    And all my zeal is soon expired.

    Shine on me, Lord, new life impart,
    Fresh ardors kindle in my heart;
    One ray of Thy all quickening light
    Dispels the sloth and clouds of night.

    Lord, lest the tempter me surprise,
    Watch over Thine own sacrifice;
    All loose, all idle thoughts cast out,
    And make my very dreams devout.

    Praise God, from whom all blessings flow,
    Praise Him all creatures here below;
    Praise Him above, ye heav’nly host,
    Praise Father, Son, and Holy Ghost.

     
    #1
    Last edited: Sep 17, 2018
    Bobby Cole likes this.
  2. Kate Ellery

    Kate Ellery Veteran Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2015
    Messages:
    13,197
    Likes Received:
    2,071
    @Ken Anderson I’m not religious despite going to a catholic school in my junior schooling
    However we enjoy social ballroom dancing, at most dances the organiser plays at least 3 hymns that have been recorded and played in the correct tempo for dancing.

    I just love singing along ,while dancing ...as allot of dancers do when they are played
     
    #2
    Bobby Cole likes this.
  3. Don Alaska

    Don Alaska Very Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2018
    Messages:
    1,652
    Likes Received:
    2,454
    @Ken Anderson I recognize the "Doxology" but none of the others. I admit, I am not the musical person in this family, so my wife may know them. Do you have the tune names that usually is used with the lyrics?
     
    #3
    Bobby Cole likes this.
  4. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Greeter
    Moderator Registered

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2015
    Messages:
    10,608
    Likes Received:
    14,593
    Take My Life and Let it Be

    Frances Ridley Havergal wrote "Take My Life and Let it Be, as well as "My Life for Me" in the 1870s when she was in her late 30s.

    She was born into an Anglican family in Astley, Worcestershire, England. Her father was an Anglican clergyman, hymn writer, and composer, and her brother was a priest in the Church of England, as well as an organist.

    Frances was a gifted singer and frequently sang with the Philharmonic.

    Although she had been a Christian for years, she felt something was missing in her life. In 1873, she received a book entitled "All for Jesus," which emphasized the significance of making Christ the king of every part of your life. The book moved her, and she promised to make a complete consecration for Christ.

    Not long afterward, she spent several days with ten people in a house, some of whom were unbelievers, and others who, although Christians, had not fully devoted their lives to Christ.

    "Lord, give me this house," she prayed. Then she went to work witnessing to the people around her, and before she left all ten were committed Christians.

    She wrote "Take My Life and Let it Be" on the last day of her stay there.

    In the years that followed, she often used her hymn in her own devotions. One day, she pondered the words that she had written, "Take my voice and let me sing, Always only for my King," and she realized she hadn't been doing that. From that point on, she sang only for the Lord.

    Another day, she considered another line of her hymn - "Take my silver and my gold, Not a mite would I withhold," and she realized that she hadn't lived up to that. She had accumulated a great deal of jewelry. She donated all of it to the Church Missionary Society, retaining only one brooch and one locket, which she had been given by her mother.

    She died of peritonitis and went to be with the Lord at the age of 42, and is buried alongside her parents and near her sister. Most of her work was published posthumously.

    Take my life, and let it be
    Consecrated, Lord, to Thee;
    Take my moments and my days,
    Let them flow in ceaseless praise,
    Let them flow in ceaseless praise.

    Take my hands, and let them move
    At the impulse of Thy love;
    Take my feet and let them be
    Swift and beautiful for Thee,
    Swift and beautiful for Thee.

    Take my voice, and let me sing
    Always, only, for my King;
    Take my lips, and let them be
    Filled with messages from Thee,
    Filled with messages from Thee.

    Take my silver and my gold;
    Not a mite would I withhold;
    Take my intellect, and use
    Every power as Thou shalt choose,
    Every power as Thou shalt choose.

    Take my will, and make it Thine;
    It shall be no longer mine.
    Take my heart; it is Thine own;
    It shall be Thy royal throne,
    It shall be Thy royal throne.

    Take my love; my Lord, I pour
    At Thy feet its treasure-store.
    Take myself, and I will be
    Ever, only, all for Thee,
    Ever, only, all for Thee.

     
    #4
    Last edited: Sep 17, 2018
    Bobby Cole likes this.
  5. Don Alaska

    Don Alaska Very Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2018
    Messages:
    1,652
    Likes Received:
    2,454
    That one I recognize.
     
    #5
    Ken Anderson likes this.
  6. Holly Saunders

    Holly Saunders Veteran Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2015
    Messages:
    33,208
    Likes Received:
    10,414
    http://www.winchestercollege.org/

    Amazing how many Hymns were written by British priests or ministers... I remember very well learning in RE about Thomas ken because he was one who refused lodging to Nell Gwynne..., Charles ll most infamous mistress.... yet lived to tell the tale...and even flourish



    Growing up a regular church attender ... I remember very well the protestant doxology,

    Praise God, from whom all blessings flow;
    Praise Him, all creatures here below;
    Praise Him above, ye heavenly host;
    Praise Father, Son, and Holy Ghost.


    .
    .but very little else beyond that, save for lots of psalms & hymns which I can still recite from memory to this day... despite not setting foot at a service ( although often at church to pray)... for many years
     
    #6
    Ken Anderson likes this.
  7. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Greeter
    Moderator Registered

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2015
    Messages:
    10,608
    Likes Received:
    14,593
    That probably not a matter of memory. I think most churches use just those four lines as a doxology, and don't sing the rest.
     
    #7
    Holly Saunders likes this.
  8. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Greeter
    Moderator Registered

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2015
    Messages:
    10,608
    Likes Received:
    14,593
    Silent Night

    Here's one I know you've heard of. It was Christmas Eve in the Austrian Alps. At the Church of Saint Nicholas in Oberndorf, near Salzburg, Father Joseph Mohr prepared for the midnight service.

    The church organ was broken. The carefully planned music portion of the service was in disarray.

    Father Mohr had the idea of writing a new song, one that wouldn't need to be accompanied by an organ. He had the idea for a beginning: "Silent night, holy night, all is calm, all is bright."

    He took that to his organist, Franz Gruber, explained what he had in mind and asked Gruber to help him compose a simple tune, one that could be accompanied by a guitar.

    That same night, December 24, 1818, "Silent Night" was sung for the first time as a duet, accompanied by a guitar, at the Church of Saint Nicholas in Oberndorf.

    Shortly afterward, when Karl Mauracher came to repair the organ, he heard about the near disaster on Christmas Eve. Given a copy of the tune, he spread it throughout the Austrian Alpine region, entitled "Tiroler Volkslied."

    The song came to the attention of the Strasser family, makers of fine chamois-skin gloves. To drum up business at fairs and festivals, the four Strasser children would sing in front of their parent's booth, later becoming popular folk singers throughout the Alps.

    When they sand "Tiroler Volkslied," people loved it. Later, it came to the attention of the king and queen, and the Strasser children were asked to give a royal performance.

    "Silent Night" was first published for congregational singing in 1838 in a German hymnbook, and was used in the United States in German congregations, appearing in English form in a book of Sunday School songs in 1863.

    Silent Night, by Joseph Mohr and Franz Gruber

    Silent night, Holy night,
    All is calm, All is bright
    Round yon virgin mother and child.
    Holy infant so tender and mild,
    Sleep in heavenly peace.
    Sleep in heavenly peace.

    Silent night, Holy night,
    Shepherds quake at the sight,
    Glories stream from heaven afar,
    Heavenly hosts sing alleluia;
    Christ the Savior, is born!
    Christ the Savior, is born!

    Silent night, Holy night,
    Son of God, Love's pure light
    Radiant beams from thy holy face,
    With the dawn of redeeming grace,
    Jesus, Lord, at thy birth.
    Jesus, Lord, at thy birth.

     
    #8
    Last edited: Sep 17, 2018
    Yvonne Smith and Don Alaska like this.
  9. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Greeter
    Moderator Registered

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2015
    Messages:
    10,608
    Likes Received:
    14,593


    It takes a while for them to get going in that last one.
     
    #9
  10. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Greeter
    Moderator Registered

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2015
    Messages:
    10,608
    Likes Received:
    14,593
    Take Time to Be Holy

    The lyrics to "Take Time to Be Holy" were written by William Longstaff in 1882. Longstaff was a wealthy Englishman who served as treasurer for Bethesda Free Chapel in Sunderland, a Northeast England port city. His church hosted the first meetings held by Dwight Lyman Moody and Ira David Sankey in that area, and Longstaff became a supporter of the two, who published books of Christian hymns.

    In his book of Christian hymn stories, Sankey said that Longstaff was inspired to write the poem by a sermon he heard in New Brighton on the text, "Be holy, for I am holy," which was based on 1 Peter 1:16. George Stebbins, who composed the music, said that Longstaff wrote the words to the poem after hearing a missionary to China, who had preached on the same verse. Perhaps both were an influence, or maybe the missionary was preaching in New Brighton.

    Stebbins himself traveled with people like Dwight L. Moody, Major Daniel Whittle, Philip P. Bliss, Ira Sankey, William Doane, and Fanny Crosby. In 1890, he was working in India with the evangelist, George Pentecost. Some mentioned the need for a hymn on holiness. He had long had a habit of cutting out poems that he particularly liked and saving them in a notebook. Searching through his notebook, he found the poem by Longstaff that he had previously clipped and saved.

    He composed the music and sent the words and music to Ira Sankey in New York, who published the hymn. George Stebbins lived to be a hundred years old. Longstaff, who died in 1894, wrote a number of other hymns that appeared in the Salvation Army's newspaper in the 1890s, but I believe that "Take Time to Be Holy" is the only one that has found its way into several Christian hymnbooks.

    Take Time to be Holy
    William D. Longstaff and George C. Stebbins

    Take time to be holy,
    speak oft with thy Lord;
    abide in him always,
    and feed on his word.
    Make friends of God's children,
    help those who are weak,
    forgetting in nothing
    his blessing to seek.

    Take time to be holy,
    the world rushes on;
    spend much time in secret
    with Jesus alone.
    By looking to Jesus,
    like him thou shalt be;
    thy friends in thy conduct
    his likeness shall see.

    Take time to be holy,
    let him be thy guide,
    and run not before him,
    whatever betide.
    In joy or in sorrow,
    still follow the Lord,
    and, looking to Jesus,
    still trust in his word.

    Take time to be holy,
    be calm in thy soul,
    each thought and each motive
    beneath his control.
    Thus led by his spirit
    to fountains of love,
    thou soon shalt be fitted
    for service above.

     
    #10
    Bill Boggs likes this.
  11. Yvonne Smith

    Yvonne Smith Greeter
    Moderator Registered

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2015
    Messages:
    6,152
    Likes Received:
    9,264
    One of the Christmas songs that I have always loved is by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, and is called “I Heard the Bells on Christmas Day”, but until a few years ago, I had no idea of the background of the song, and maybe was not even aware of who wrote it.
    This rendition by the Mormon Tabernacle Choir, tells the story behind the song beautifully, as they also sing the song in their amazing style and with the grand Salt Lake tabernacle organ.

     
    #11
    Bobby Cole and Ken Anderson like this.
  12. Don Alaska

    Don Alaska Very Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2018
    Messages:
    1,652
    Likes Received:
    2,454
    Very nice, Ken. That is not a hymn with which I am familiar.
     
    #12
  13. Don Alaska

    Don Alaska Very Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2018
    Messages:
    1,652
    Likes Received:
    2,454
    Very nice, Yvonne! Thanks for posting that
     
    #13
    Yvonne Smith likes this.
  14. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Greeter
    Moderator Registered

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2015
    Messages:
    10,608
    Likes Received:
    14,593
    I Know Whom I Have Believed

    "I know whom I have believed and am persuaded that He is able to keep what I have committed to Him until that day." -- 2 Timothy 1:12

    Daniel Whittle was born in Chicopee Falls, Massachusetts in 1840. He left home as a teenager and moved to Chicago, where he found work as a cashier at the Wells Fargo Bank.

    When the Civil War broke out, he enlisted in the 72nd Illinois Infantry. On the day before his departure, he married Abbie Hanson.

    He was badly wounded in the Battle of Vicksburg in 1863, and taken prisoner by the Confederates. He lost his right arm.

    While in the Confederate hospital recovering from his injuries, he picked up a New Testament. As he read the words of the NT, he felt the urge to accept the Lord as his Savior. He wasn't ready to do that yet, however, and drifted off to sleep.

    He was awakened by a Confederate orderly, who told him that another POW was dying and wanted someone to pray with him. Whittle said that he wasn't able to and that someone else should be found. The orderly replied, "But I thought you were a Christian. I saw you reading your Bible."

    Of that moment in his life, Whittle wrote, "I dropped to my knees and held the boy's hand in mine. In a few broken words, I confessed my sins and asked Christ to forgive me. I believed right there that He did forgive me. I then prayed and pleaded God's promises. When I arose from my knees, he was dead. A look of peace had come over his troubled face, and I cannot but believe that God who used him to bring me to the Savior used me to lead him to trust Christ's precious blood and find pardon."

    Whittle later wrote this hymn - "I Know Whom I Have Believed" as an expression of his faith in Jesus Christ. It was later arranged by James McGranahan, a 19th-century musician and composer, who was the same age as Whittle.

    I Know Whom I Have Believed
    Daniel W. Whittle, James McGranahan

    I know not why God’s wondrous grace
    To me, He hath made known,
    Nor why, unworthy, Christ in love
    Redeemed me for His own.

    I know not how this saving faith
    To me, He did impart,
    Nor how believing in His Word
    Wrought peace within my heart.

    I know not how the Spirit moves,
    Convincing men of sin,
    Revealing Jesus through the Word,
    Creating faith in Him.

    I know not what of good or ill
    May be reserved for me,
    Of weary ways or golden days,
    Before His face I see.

    I know not when my Lord may come,
    At night or noonday fair,
    Nor if I walk the vale with Him,
    Or meet Him in the air.


    Refrain:
    But “I know Whom I have believed,
    And am persuaded that He is able
    To keep that which I’ve committed
    Unto Him against that day.”

     
    #14
  15. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Greeter
    Moderator Registered

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2015
    Messages:
    10,608
    Likes Received:
    14,593
    To God Be the Glory

    "Be exalted, O God, above the heavens, And Your glory above all the earth." -- Psalm 108:5

    Fanny Crosby's "To God Be the Glory" was first published in "Brightest and Best," a volume of hymns printed in 1875 by William Doane and Robert Lowry. However, it was then entitled, "Praise for Redemption."

    That volume of hymns included several that became classes, but "Praise for Redemption" was all but ignored. It wasn't widely sung, nor was it included in many hymnals.

    In 1954, while preparing for the Billy Graham evangelistic crusade at London's Harringay Arena, Cliff Barrows, the music directory for Billy Graham Crusades decided to include it in the "Greater London Crusade Song Book," which was to be used for the event.

    The British press was critical of Billy Graham, and many were predicting that he would return to the United States without completing the scheduled events. Due to the criticism, anticipated funding was pulled, and the Billy Graham Crusades was forced to cut salaries. A member of the British Parliament accused Billy Graham of interfering with British politics under the guise of religion and brought the matter up in the House of Commons. Several of Graham's advisors recommended he cancel or postpone the meetings.

    As it turned out, the added publicity was probably responsible for a good turnout. Harringay Arena was packed for three months, and "Praise for Redemption," then renamed "To God Be the Glory," was used in nearly every service, launching it into popularity and its inclusion in many Christian hymnals. It was sung at Billy Graham's funeral.

    To God Be the Glory
    by Fanny J. Crosby and William H. Doane

    To God be the glory, great things He hath done,
    So loved He the world that He gave us His Son,
    Who yielded His life an atonement for sin,
    And opened the life gate that all may go in.

    Refrain:
    Praise the Lord, praise the Lord, let the earth hear His voice!
    Praise the Lord, praise the Lord, let the people rejoice!
    Oh, come to the Father, through Jesus the Son,
    And give Him the glory, great things He hath done.

    Oh, perfect redemption, the purchase of blood,
    To every believer the promise of God;
    The vilest offender who truly believes,
    That moment from Jesus a pardon receives.

    Great things He hath taught us, great things He hath done,
    And great our rejoicing through Jesus the Son;
    But purer, and higher, and greater will be
    Our wonder, our transport, when Jesus we see.




     
    #15
    Don Alaska likes this.
  16. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Greeter
    Moderator Registered

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2015
    Messages:
    10,608
    Likes Received:
    14,593
    I just watched a movie about the writing of a Christian hymn. Intended probably more for children, it tells the story of a moment in the life of Frederick M. Lehman, a pastor who had emigrated to the United States from Germany as a child, settling in Iowa, where he lived most of his childhood.

    The movie doesn’t mention it because this wasn’t the period in his life that the movie was about, but he came to Christ at the age of eleven. He studied for the ministry and pastored in Iowa, Indiana, and Missouri.

    Although he was later to publish hundreds of songs, compiling five songbooks, and became a founder of the Nazarene Publishing House, his first song was the one that the movie was about.

    He was having trouble with the third verse. The song was about the love of God, and he was having trouble expressing the love of God in words. At this point in his life, World War I had begun and one of his sons was overseas. The church where he was preaching was low on funds as so many of the men were in the military and everything was going into the war effort, so they were unable to pay him enough to support his family.

    His children decided to help him write the third verse of the song, hoping that he would be able to sell it and keep from having to go to the poor house. They find a poem on a card that was about the love of God and set out to see if they can find the author and get permission for his father to adapt the words to his song.

    Skipping a lot of the peripheral stuff, they learn that the words for the poem on the card had been found scratched on the wall of a room at an insane asylum. After more investigation, they find that the words had not been written by the person who had scratched them on the wall, but they had been written by a Jewish rabbi in Germany a long while ago, and that the poem was the English translation.

    Showing it to their father, he adapts the words to complete the third verse of his song.

    Movie: Indescribable



    The Love of God
    by Frederick M. Lehman (1917) and Meir Ben Isaac Nehorai (1050)

    The love of God is greater far
    Than tongue or pen can ever tell;
    It goes beyond the highest star,
    And reaches to the lowest hell;
    The guilty pair, bowed down with care,
    God gave His Son to win;
    His erring child He reconciled,
    And pardoned from his sin.
    Refrain:

    Oh, love of God, how rich and pure!
    How measureless and strong!
    It shall forevermore endure—
    The saints’ and angels’ song.

    When hoary time shall pass away,
    And earthly thrones and kingdoms fall,
    When men who here refuse to pray,
    On rocks and hills and mountains call,
    God’s love so sure, shall still endure,
    All measureless and strong;
    Redeeming grace to Adam’s race—
    The saints’ and angels’ song.

    Could we with ink the ocean fill,
    And were the skies of parchment made,
    Were every stalk on earth a quill,
    And every man a scribe by trade;
    To write the love of God above
    Would drain the ocean dry;
    Nor could the scroll contain the whole,
    Though stretched from sky to sky.
     
    #16
    Don Alaska and Yvonne Smith like this.

Share This Page