Easter Traditions

Discussion in 'Holidays & Traditions' started by Terry Page, Apr 14, 2017.

  1. Terry Page

    Terry Page Veteran Member
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    It's the first time I have been in Russia during Easter so I will taste the local cuisine which mainly consists of two items Kulich (Easter bread) and Pashka (cream cheese dessert)

    Lisa makes the Pashka a day in advance, because it needs to drain. I made one at home way back in the 1970s during my Russian period [​IMG] I recall I loved it ........so look forward to tasting the authentic version. They have a different range of soft cheeses here, what they call cottage cheese is similar to our mascarpone, their cream cheese different again.......the pashka consists of mainly various cream cheeses and fruit and nuts......

    Kulich (Russian: кули́ч;, from Greek κόλλιξ , and ultimately Hebrew: חלה‎‎ meaning a roll or loaf of bread) is a kind of Easter bread that is traditional in the Orthodox Christian faith and is eaten in countries like Russia, Belarus, Bulgaria, Romania, Ukraine, Georgia and Serbia.

    Traditionally after the Easter service, the kulich, which has been put into a basket and decorated with colorful flowers, is blessed by the priest. Blessed kulich is eaten before breakfast each day. Any leftover kulich that is not blessed is eaten with Paskha for dessert.

    Kulich is baked in tall, cylindrical tins (like coffee or fruit juice tins). When cooled, kulich is decorated with white icing (which slightly drizzles down the sides) and colorful flowers. Historically, it was often served with cheese paska bearing the symbol XB (from the traditional Easter greeting of Христос воскресе, "Christ is Risen").


    Pashka

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    Kulich (Russian Bread)

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  2. Von Jones

    Von Jones Veteran Member
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    The presentations themselves make my mouth water. Yum, yum:)
     
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  3. Chrissy Cross

    Chrissy Cross Veteran Member
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    IMG_0716.JPG IMG_0715.JPG


    In Hungary it's called Kalacs

    Also when I lived in Hungary, I couldn't find anything resembling what we in the states call cottage cheese.

    This is the closest thing...curd cheese, not creamy like ours...it's the pic on top...I added it and that's where it went and don't have time to fix things.
     
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    Last edited: Apr 14, 2017
  4. Babs Hunt

    Babs Hunt Veteran Member
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    Easter traditions in our Family have certainly changed over the years since my birth, etc. When I was growing up in my own family with my siblings we always got Easter outfits complete with Easter bonnets for all the girls. There was alway Church on Easter Sunday and moma always had a big meal cooked for us consisting of a ham, roast beef, or turkey with all the sides and dessert. We dyed Easter eggs and got chocolate bunnies...and sometimes even real dyed Easter chicks. :)

    Later after all of us grew up with families of our own, etc. and my dad was not on earth anymore, my mom would have us over and she always cooked cajun ham and rice dressing with militon and/or eggplant in it. The rest of us would all bring sides and desserts and drinks. We continued to dye some eggs but since there was so many of us now we would often buy the plastic eggs and fill them with candy and the golden eggs with some money, And then we would hide those eggs for all the grandchildren to find. As Moma got older we took over more and more of the planning, etc. for Easter but until the last couple years of her life she still made the ham and rice dressings.

    Then after my Moma left this earth, my siblings and I started holding a Family Reunion on each Saturday before Easter...this has been going on for over 12 years now. We boil crawfish with corn, potatoes, mushrooms, and sausage. Everyone brings desserts and drinks and we all enjoy visiting with each other on this day. Especially now that we pretty much live in different places and don't get to see each other much. There is still an Easter egg hunt for the grandkids, etc. Then on Easter Sunday our individual families do their own thing or get together with each other to share a meal which may have ham or not.

    This year most of my siblings will not be at the Family Reunion and I won't be either as I am not over my bronchitis enough to feel up to going. All my daughters and their families are going though and I hope they will have a wonderful time with their cousins and the aunt or uncle that will be able to make it this year.

    Happy Easter one and all....wherever you are and however you celebrate (or don't) it.
     
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  5. Chrissy Cross

    Chrissy Cross Veteran Member
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    @Babs Hunt , I had forgotten about the dyed baby chicks...also, my Easter as a child was very similar to yours.
     
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    Last edited: Apr 15, 2017
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  6. Terry Page

    Terry Page Veteran Member
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    Well here is our traditional Russian Easter breakfast, it was way to sweet for me, but Lisa of course loved it and half the Pashka was consumed [​IMG]


    The Bread (Kulich)

    [​IMG]


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    The Pashka

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]



    [​IMG]
     
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  7. Terry Page

    Terry Page Veteran Member
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    Having digested the sweet breakfast, for dinner we had a simple slow roasted lamb joint with roast potatoes and carrots...followed by a dessert of chocolate egg and more pashka [​IMG]


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  8. Ken Anderson

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  9. Ken Anderson

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    Happy Easter, everyone.
     
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  10. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Greeter
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  11. Beth Gallagher

    Beth Gallagher Very Well-Known Member
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  12. Beth Gallagher

    Beth Gallagher Very Well-Known Member
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    We had Easter traditions when I was a kid, and continued them for our children. Coloring and hiding eggs, big dinner with family, egg hunt, alka-seltzer and a nap. Since our kids are grown and scattered to the winds we usually just get a phone call from all of them and have a relaxing day. (Still have a big meal, alka-seltzer, and a nap.)
     
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  13. Mary Robi

    Mary Robi Very Well-Known Member
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    My mother would get the "Easter box" down from the attic and assemble the baskets.

    Some of the baskets, plastic eggs and cellophane grass were probably old enough to have been used at the FIRST Easter (my mother brought new meaning to "frugal"...…...in her mind, there was absolutely no reason to buy new stuff when the grass from five years ago was still sort of green and only had a little bit of melted chocolate mashed up in it...…)

    But we DID get new dresses and shoes and socks and lacy little gloves and hats to wear to church on Easter. Easter was quite often cold, sometimes even snowy and we'd have to wear our winter coats, which rather defeated the pure magnificence of the new dresses.

    Mom would take us down to the Leader Store, which was staffed by the crabbiest old ladies in existence, who hated everyone in general and children in particular. The secret was to get in there, get your shopping done and get out before the Evil Eye burned a hole entirely through your head.

    One Easter Sunday, I managed to poke myself in the eye with the frond of an Easter Lily and got to spend the afternoon at the emergency room having it looked at. AND I missed the Easter Egg Hunt.
     
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  14. Nancy Hart

    Nancy Hart Very Well-Known Member
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    The White House Easter Egg Roll

    1965
    Easter-Egg-Roll-1965.jpg

    "On Easter Monday in 1876, upwards of 10,000 children with the day off from school marched toward the newly completed cast-iron dome of the U.S Capitol toting baskets abounding in a rainbow of colorfully dyed eggs. They had come to carry on a peculiar holiday tradition that had arisen in the nation’s capital during the 1800's in which young revelers rolled hard-boiled eggs down the hills of Washington, D.C., to see which ones traveled the farthest without breaking. ...

    Congress was so outraged at the damage caused by the egg-rollers that it essentially told the kids to get off its lawn. Proving as hard-boiled as the eggs that tumbled down Capitol Hill, Congress passed the Turf Protection Law “to prevent any portion of the Capitol grounds and terraces from being used as play-grounds or otherwise, so far as may be necessary to protect the public property, turf, and grass from destruction and injury.” Less than two weeks after Easter, President Ulysses S. Grant signed the measure into law on April 29, 1876.

    Rain washed out Easter festivities in 1877, but when the egg-rollers tried to return to Capitol Hill the following year, the police turned them away. The District of Columbia’s disappointed children, however, found a warm welcome on the other end of Pennsylvania Avenue where President Rutherford B. Hayes instructed his guards to allow the popular pastime to continue on the hillocks in the White House’s backyard.

    According to the White House Historical Association, some historians credit first lady Dolly Madison with first proposing the idea of a public egg roll around 1810, and there are accounts of informal egg rolls staged by the children of Presidents Abraham Lincoln and Andrew Johnson. The 1878 event hosted by Hayes on the South Lawn, however, stands as the first official White House Easter Egg Roll. ..."
     
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