My Reloading Bench

Discussion in 'Hobbies & Crafts' started by Hal Pollner, Jan 20, 2020.

  1. Hal Pollner

    Hal Pollner Very Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2018
    Messages:
    3,934
    Likes Received:
    3,109
    I reload for only one Caliber .45 Long Colt.

    The recipe is a 200 grain Semi-Wadcutter over 9.0 grains of Unique and a Large Primer.

    The gun is a single-action Ruger Blackhawk in .45 LC.

    Ready on the Firing Line!
    Hal
    115.JPG 006.JPG

     
    #1
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2020
  2. Hal Pollner

    Hal Pollner Very Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2018
    Messages:
    3,934
    Likes Received:
    3,109

    I reload only one caliber...45 Long Colt.

    My recipe is a 200 gr. Semi-Wadcutter over 9 gr. Unique, over a Large Pistol Primer.

    My Chronometer indicates 1000 FPS with this load, giving 444 ft-lbs of Muzzle Energy.

    The pistol is a Ruger Blackhawk Single-Action Army patterned after the Colt Peacemaker.

    Hal
    006.JPG
    115.JPG
     
    #2
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2020
    Bess Barber likes this.
  3. Bess Barber

    Bess Barber Very Well-Known Member
    Task Force Registered

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2019
    Messages:
    3,764
    Likes Received:
    7,266
    This was my husband's favorite hobby. He was an avid gun collector. I almost teared up when I saw your beautiful set up! He bought most of his supplies from gun shows. He also built a wall cabinet full of smaller drawers where he stored the various bullet sizes. I gave all this to his two sons after he died since this is where he wanted all that to go. Both of them were military men and appreciated his collection.

    Just remember, if your house ever catches on fire, RUN. With a room like that, your house won't just burn, it may explode. :D
     
    #3
    Faye Fox and Frank Sanoica like this.
  4. Frank Sanoica

    Frank Sanoica Veteran Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2016
    Messages:
    8,130
    Likes Received:
    8,498
    @Bess Barber

    The "gun powders" he has there are actually "smokeless powder", totally incapable of exploding when lit; they burn quietly and slowly, unless confined tightly. Smokeless powder actually contains high-explosive ingredients such as nitro-glycerin, and gun cotton.
    Frank
     
    #4
    Faye Fox and Bill Boggs like this.
  5. Hal Pollner

    Hal Pollner Very Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2018
    Messages:
    3,934
    Likes Received:
    3,109
    Frank is right as hell!

    Only Black Powder is unstable.

    Hal
     
    #5
    Faye Fox likes this.
  6. Faye Fox

    Faye Fox Very Well-Known Member
    Task Force Registered

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2019
    Messages:
    1,053
    Likes Received:
    1,719
    This is why I always used Pyrodex and never the black powder for my muzzleloaders. My favorite varmint rifle growing up on the ranch was an 8mm version of the .240 super. Maybe you boys can refresh my memory. Wasn't that a 30-06 brass necked down? My dad made a version of that using the 8mm M98 bolt. The trajectory was flat but it was a barrel burner. I loved that rife and declared war on the red diggers that were destroying the one-acre garden. I went through two barrels on that rifle. I forget what scope was on it, but it was accurate. It had a custom super duper recoil pad one of my dad's friends made for it. My dad's friend would say to him, at least your daughter gets her kicks in a healthy way.

    It might be of interest to this thread that nitro based explosives that are known as dynamite are disposed of by burning. It burns hot. Even the old stuff crystalized with nitro and so unstable it has to be handled carefully, just burns when put in a fire. If dynamite storage catches on fire the only worry is if something heavy fell on it, causing a concussion that would make it explode. I was driving a truck loaded with boxes of 60% nitro powder up to a mine many years ago and the engine got hot and the oil on the engine caught fire. I got out and took off running downhill. The fire was so hot that the truck was unrecognizable. Luckily I was in a cut with rock banks on both sides and no timber was close. The other lucky thing was by the time the layered argillite rock got so hot it started to explode, the dynamite was burned to a nonexplosive point so flying rock didn't ignite it.
     
    #6
    Frank Sanoica likes this.
  7. Frank Sanoica

    Frank Sanoica Veteran Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2016
    Messages:
    8,130
    Likes Received:
    8,498
    @Faye Fox

    At this point, it might be educational to add one or two more facts about dynamite in general, and high explosives in particular. Dynamites traditionally have been made of mostly nitroglycerin absorbed into a "carrier" material such as sawdust or better, an oxidizing material like sodium nitrate, or both. It is far safer in this form than it's liquid, pourable form.

    Nitroglycerin freezes easily, forming crystals which MIGHT (emphasis here, it's still out to jury after 150 years) shift enough upon thawing, causing detonation. For this reason, "non-freezing" dynamites were developed, using a mix of Nitroglycol instead of 100% nitroglycerin, which is simply plain old automotive antifreeze, Ethylene Glycol, nitrated similarly to glycerin. Other materials have also been used.

    Dynamite traditionally is produced in 1/2-lb. "sticks", made of heavy waxed paper, making them about 1" in diameter and about 8" long. Dynamite upon detonating, the process by which it "explodes", has a typically high "burning rate", about 20,000 feet per second, give or take some. This means that a "string" of dynamite sticks laid end-to-end four miles long when ignited at one end would be "blown" in ONE SECOND! FAST!

    Dynamite is typically sold in two strengths: 40% nitro and 60% nitro, by weight, depending upon intended use.

    Frank
     
    #7
    Faye Fox likes this.
  8. Faye Fox

    Faye Fox Very Well-Known Member
    Task Force Registered

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2019
    Messages:
    1,053
    Likes Received:
    1,719
    @Frank Sanoica Yes good info and might be of interest to many. I don't want to get Hal's reloading thread too far off track. As far as the end to end sticks blowing if laid out on the ground would be fun to discuss. Good point about the old dynamite freezing and super dangerous when found in old abandon mines or storage sheds. Burning it with minimal handing is best. Another interesting point is the headache one can get just handling nitro based dynamite, especially 60%.

    I did some cartridge reloading but had a friend that loved to do it, so I traded rebluing and browning metal parts and stock refinishing and custom pistol grip making for custom loaded ammo.

    @Hal Pollner That is an impressive looking reloading setup. I am impressed by how clean and orderly it looks.
     
    #8
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2020
    Frank Sanoica likes this.
  9. Hal Pollner

    Hal Pollner Very Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2018
    Messages:
    3,934
    Likes Received:
    3,109
    Faye Fox's Avatars distract me so much that I lose my train of thought!:rolleyes:

    Howl
     
    #9
    Faye Fox likes this.
  10. Tex Dennis

    Tex Dennis Very Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2018
    Messages:
    540
    Likes Received:
    887
    Going to nit pick here, HAL have you ever seen the words 45 Long Cold on an ammunition box?
    In a loading book? or was it just 45 Colt
    Nit picking over now.
     
    #10
  11. Faye Fox

    Faye Fox Very Well-Known Member
    Task Force Registered

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2019
    Messages:
    1,053
    Likes Received:
    1,719
    @Tex Dennis
    ACI-USA---45LC-255-Lead-s-o__17451.1519095946.jpg IMG_9672.jpg
     
    #11
  12. Tex Dennis

    Tex Dennis Very Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2018
    Messages:
    540
    Likes Received:
    887
    1st I have see that written on a box in my life I admit, thank you for posting
     
    #12
    Frank Sanoica and Faye Fox like this.
  13. Hal Pollner

    Hal Pollner Very Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2018
    Messages:
    3,934
    Likes Received:
    3,109
    HA HA...you said "Long Cold", Tex!

    Hal
     
    #13
    Faye Fox likes this.

Share This Page