Out And About

Discussion in 'Photos & Video' started by Peter Renfro, Aug 3, 2020.

  1. Peter Renfro

    Peter Renfro Very Well-Known Member
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    Out and about.JPG

    From the dining room window

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    Flying Amishman
     
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  2. Peter Renfro

    Peter Renfro Very Well-Known Member
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    DSC_0007.JPG
    Shocks of wheat
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    Bloom and Bee
     
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  3. Peter Renfro

    Peter Renfro Very Well-Known Member
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    DSC_0009.JPG
    Osprey chicks in a repurposed satellite dish
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    Heron on River Road
     
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  4. Peter Renfro

    Peter Renfro Very Well-Known Member
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    About 5 minutes ago. There aren't gonna be any beans left come September. This is why I don't hunt, I harvest. 2 deer a year fills the freezer just fine.
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  5. John Brunner

    John Brunner Very Well-Known Member
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    Very nice.

    I had 2 families of deer in my yard most of the week, but taking a picture through the sliding glass door doesn't work very well because of where the camera focuses.

    Love that blue heron. There was one that frequented the overflow pond by the office I used to work at. I kept a pair of binoculars at my desk.

    Regarding deer & soybeans: when I moved here, I almost bought a small house that had been built in the 1700s. I just love the architecture. But I could tell it was gonna be a money pit. It sat on 96 acres, 40 of which were leased out to a soybean farmer. You would walk through the field after harvest time and see nothing but hoof prints.

    My dad was from Amish country (worked for G.C. Murphys his entire career, out of McKeesport PA), although I never lived there myself. My mom would make homemade pon haus for him.

    Your pics remind me that when I first moved here from the nasty city, I would walk out my door to drive to work and would just stop for a few seconds and smile at what I have around me. This is the important stuff that transcends everything else.
     
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  6. Bill Boggs

    Bill Boggs Veteran Member
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    All these are good, memory laden photos. Wish I could get out and about and wag my camera along with me,
    I’d try some of this myself.
     
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  7. Peter Renfro

    Peter Renfro Very Well-Known Member
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    Took a ride, saw these Mennonites working. Strange sect. They have tractors. but look at the tires. No air,these wheels are handmade. Real works of art.
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    Last edited: Sep 28, 2020
  8. John Brunner

    John Brunner Very Well-Known Member
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    I wonder why they don't use regular tires & wheels. It must be a cost thing, since they're using a modern tractor and burning diesel (I believe that farming is where they make "modern world" compromises.).

    I've used a '33 International tractor with a bent-spring metal seat and metal wheels with studs in them...it's not a comfortable ride.
     
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  9. Peter Renfro

    Peter Renfro Very Well-Known Member
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    These thing have to be way more expensive than regular tires. No it is a religious thing. Mennonites run the gamut from being to all outward appearances just like,"us",to making the Amish look down right progressive. Just depends on the sect.
    Heavy Mennonite/Amish population is a double edged sword. On one hand they are buying up many many defunct old farms putting them back into a more conventional poly-ag use. The other option is that the BTO.s buy them up,clear the hedgerows, tear down the buildings, and put them into mono-ag. Mennonite and Amish carry the full tax load while the BTO,s take literally millions in government aid. Mennonite are some industrious suckers. They work in large extended multigenerational enterprises. Mostly ag related businesses. Feed mills, equipment sales, water and manure systems,etc. Both groups are able to provide employment for their own,but very little spill over. Mennonites are so entrained that you would have to deliberately plan to avoid doing business with them. Amish are more insular, they tend to do their local business, with in their community with the Mennonites as a back up. They choose "English" businesses' last.

    Many retirees make cash on the side by being "Yoder toters". Having a large capacity van or a pick-up and trailer can be quite lucrative.
     
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