Planted More Comfrey Today

Discussion in 'Crops & Gardens' started by Yvonne Smith, Apr 15, 2015.

  1. Yvonne Smith

    Yvonne Smith Senior Staff
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    When I lived in Idaho, I had a lot of comfrey, and every spring I would divide it and start more comfrey plants. Each year, I had more.
    Comfrey grows like a weed, and is usually just as hard to kill. If you chop it up with a rototiller, then you have just started a whole patch of comfrey, because every single bit of chopped root will grow.
    However, comfrey has a lot of medicinal uses, from both the roots and the leaves, so it is an excellent plant to be growing.
    Plus, it is also a great green tea to feed your plants , made from the comfrey leaves. Mainly, I have used it as a cooked green, or made into a tea, or in a green smoothie.
    It makes a good substitute for spinach when cooked; but not so good raw because the leaves are fuzzy underneath (which goes away when cooked). People have eaten comfrey and used it as a medicine for centuries, however, some company did a research test and decided that lab rats that were fed comfrey extract were more likely to get cancer than rats that were not, and they said it was bad for the liver.
    So (just like sassafrass tea) we are told that it is not safe to consume.
    People DO still eat it anyway, and I have used it for many years, with no harmful results.

    Anyway....back to my story.... somehow, the comfrey that I transported here from Idaho and have grown for several years , died last summer, and did not come back up this spring. So, I ordered more from e-bay, and just finished planting 15 nice comfrey roots out alongside of the house.
    Hopefully, these will all come up and start growing. It will take a good year for the root system to get developed; but I will still have a few leaves to use this summer, hopefully.
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  2. Yvonne Smith

    Yvonne Smith Senior Staff
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    The place where I planted the comfrey was in too much shade, maybe, and gradually, fewer and fewer came up each year, and they didn’t grow well when they did come up.
    This spring, I had one lone comfrey plant, so I dug it up and moved it out in the sunshine in one of the tire planters.
    So far, it seems to like it there and is growing, so by this fall or next spring, I should be able to separate out some roots and start a few more comfrey plants again.
     
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    Last edited: Jul 1, 2020
  3. John Brunner

    John Brunner Very Well-Known Member
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    I've yet to study medicinal herbs & medicines (and more in-depth botany) as I've often wanted to do.

    Years ago I read an article in the paper discussing the continued use of Queen Anne's Lace as birth control among Appalachian women. Goodness knows how they discover that particular use, but it does work when a tea is brewed from it.

    Doesn't comfrey prefer things to be on the cool side? And I wonder if you got too much clay where you are now.
     
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  4. Yvonne Smith

    Yvonne Smith Senior Staff
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    There is definitely a LOT of clay in this ground. Where I lived in north Idaho, we had wonderful sandy soil, which I enhanced with fresh llama droppings and rototilled them in. Everything grew really well in that mix of sandy soil and fertilizer. I had comfrey and oregano growing all along my back yard fence line, and enough oregano to dry it and give some away to friends and family each year. It came back every year and kept spreading, just like the comfrey and the chives.

    Here, we have a combination of the hard clay, which is either mud or cement most of the time, and huge trees all around the property, so we do not get that much sun. However, it is also a hot climate, so even plants that are in shady areas get too hot, while not getting enough sunshine.
    I planted Jerusalem artichoke in the same area as the comfrey, and I think that it shaded out the comfrey. The one that I have left seems to be doing fine now that it is out in the sunshine and in good soil, not just the clay.
    It is still little and scruffy, but making new leaves, so I have hopes for it.

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