Planted Potatoes Yesterday

Discussion in 'Crops & Gardens' started by Sheldon Scott, Feb 4, 2019.

  1. Sheldon Scott

    Sheldon Scott Veteran Member
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    Just one 12 foot row. I don't think my garden's going to be very big this year.
     
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  2. Holly Saunders

    Holly Saunders Veteran Member
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    because there's only the 2 of us , when I grow potatoes I usually just grow them in a tub!!
     
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  3. Sheldon Scott

    Sheldon Scott Veteran Member
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    There's just 2 of us too, Holly, but I like to cut the excess with our French fry cutter and keep them in the freezer.

    I ordered corn, okra and cucumber seeds today. I'll probably buy a few tomato plants locally. That is all I plan to grow this year.
     
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  4. Don Alaska

    Don Alaska Very Well-Known Member
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    We don't plant like we used to when we had 6 children at home, but we still have a large garden and market or give away (to family) our surplus. We have developed an affection for French Fingerling potatoes that were developed in France and smuggled into the U.S. past customs in the feedbag of a racehorse that was being imported. They are pretty, yield well, and keep well. Of course, I like to grow some russets for baking and such too. We won't be planting potatoes until sometime in May.
     
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  5. Tom Galty

    Tom Galty Well-Known Member
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    What a lovely story about the Tatties being smuggled in.

    Was thinking of taking some Marmit(Not Tatties) over next time I go Vegas as its banned God noes Why

    Will start planting my earlies in about 2 weeks time as I live in the South of England, further North they plant end of March till April

    Do think that people in Norway leave it till middle May
     
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  6. Don Alaska

    Don Alaska Very Well-Known Member
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    I would just guess that the Marmite isn't labelled to U.S. standards, @Tom Galty. I can think of no other reason, as I think you can get Vegemite here (Aussie stuff) on the West Coast, although I don't know what the demand is for it here. Stuff marketed as food here have to have all the nutritional info printed on the label.
     
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  7. Yvonne Smith

    Yvonne Smith Greeter
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    I really wish that we had more places with sunshine, but the whole property (as well as the surrounding properties) are under towering trees, so we actually get very little sun once the trees leaf out in the spring.
    Besides the unwanted shade, the whole yard, front and back is full of tree roots; so it is next to impossible to dig or rototil any part of it, except for little bits here and there.
    For these reasons, we try to grow everything in planter pots, which works, but does not give the roots as much room to grow as being in the ground would do.
    I was just looking at this video of growing potatoes on top of the ground using hay bales. I have seen some gardens made with straw, but it looks like the hay might actually work better for the potatoes since it rots faster than straw would do.

     
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  8. Don Alaska

    Don Alaska Very Well-Known Member
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    @Yvonne Smith hay will work for "Ruth Stout" gardening, but straw is better since it doesn't get soggy as readily. The straw stays drier, thus reducing many diseases. If, however, you have a good source of "bad" hay (not suitable for animal feed), it would certainly be worth a try. It you shady yard, leafy greens would be the easiest things to grow in the ground. We got so used to growing food for our family that when they all left home, we have had difficulty scaling back our production. That is why we sell some and give a good deal to the family members that are still in this area. Is your shady property mostly deciduous or evergreen? If the leaves fall, you can grow cold-hardy stuff when the shade is not so intense, such as oriental greens and various lettuces, all of which tolerate or enjoy a bit of shade.
     
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