Small Towns

Discussion in 'Places I Have Lived' started by Ken Anderson, May 28, 2018.

  1. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Senior Staff
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    Eleven states have passed legislation affecting the collection of rainwater, but it is not banned in all of these states. I think the idea is that rainwater is collectively owned, and that people do not own the rights to the water that falls on their land. There are several articles on it, although some of them tend to be on the hysterical side. Accuweather has fairly balanced article on it.
     
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  2. Thomas Stearn

    Thomas Stearn Very Well-Known Member
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    Thanks again. Had never heard of that.
     
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  3. Chrissy Cross

    Chrissy Cross Veteran Member
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    Anyway, back to small towns especially ones with winters....I wouldn't move there at my age not because of the lifestyle (cowboys, rodeos) but because I just can't see myself driving on icy roads for miles and miles just for food or dr or the hospital.

    Even though Fresno is hot, I love the convenience of how close everything is...that's my ideal now.
     
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  4. Yvonne Smith

    Yvonne Smith Senior Staff
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    That is about how we are, too, Chrissy. I really miss living in a small town, or out on the edge of a small town, but in the country.
    Anywhere that I have lived, I have found people to be friendly, even in areas where there might tend to be religious cliques, or something similar. I think that part of being accepted is to accept the other people as well, and people can tell how you feel about them , usually .
    I would like to live where it is not so hot and humid in the summer; but neither Bobby or I want to have to live in snow and drive on icy roads again, just like you don’t want to do that.
    Here, we are close to doctors, hospitals should we have an emergency, and shopping is within a few blocks in almost any direction.
    No place that a person lives is ever perfect, but this one seems to meet most of our essential needs.
     
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  5. Cody Fousnaugh

    Cody Fousnaugh Veteran Member
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    That’s fine, but there are lots of people living in Denver metro that don’t mind driving in ice and snow for anything. Ice and snow are simply seasons that come with living there. Just like where Ken lives in Maine.

    Many folks here don’t understand at all why anyone would chose to live in ice and snow, yet folks there will definitely tell anyone why they wouldn’t live in Florida.
     
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  6. Chrissy Cross

    Chrissy Cross Veteran Member
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    I lived in ice and snow also...when I was younger. I wouldn't move there now at this age though.

    If I was already stuck there ...fine but if making a move I would consider my age and the hardships.

    Also, I'll drive a couple miles in snow and ice but I don't want to drive 30 or more just for food or dr.

    That's my point.

    When I was working in Wyoming that one time, we had to drive thru the grand Tetons at night in the snow...it was scary.

    Next day we read that it was closed because of an avalanche.

    We did have a great breakfast of steak and eggs at a cowboy bar/cafe though. :)

    Ive lived more of my years in snow and Cold winters than in hot places. I know snow and ice. It's only the last 14 years that Ive lived in no winter areas.
     
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  7. Cody Fousnaugh

    Cody Fousnaugh Veteran Member
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    We just want our “Western” stuff (events) back, drive into the mountains where big Bull Elk and Elk Cows are, boat and fish on freshwater lakes and live in a much smaller area where murders aren’t the big news.

    We aren’t looking for small town living, but similar to it.
     
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  8. Chrissy Cross

    Chrissy Cross Veteran Member
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    Well to get that you may be trading comfort in your old age.

    I live in Fresno and I'm not afraid of being murdered. I stay in my safe corner of Fresno. It could happen but chances are slim.

    Also, Ive asked you this before...you didn't answer....have you thought about what happens if one of you dies?

    Is your wife going to be happy living alone in the cold winter months?

    Both of you may be healthy now but things can change in a heartbeat at this age....sadly.
     
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  9. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Senior Staff
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    The reason why many small towns appear to be cliquish or unaccepting of new people moving in are probably many, but among them is the fact that small towns tend to be a lot like families, and you're not necessarily accepted by every member of the family just because you've moved into someone's house. This is why in-laws, step-parents, and step-siblings often have trouble merging with the rest of the family. My father didn't remarry until more than ten years after our mother died, yet most of my brothers never liked the woman he married. We didn't refer to her as our step-mother because we were all adults by the time he married her and because she was younger than a couple of my brothers. However, she was a perfectly nice person.

    Small towns are a bit like that. It's not always fair but it is reasonable. I was feeling a little put out here in Millinocket when the volunteer fire department and EMS service were not at all interested in having me as a volunteer, despite the fact that I had more experience than most of them, and was licensed to teach the classes that they were having to drive a long ways for, in order to maintain their certifications. They had only a couple of paramedics, and I was licensed to teach paramedics. That didn't matter. The volunteer fire department was a closed social club, it seemed.

    Then, a few years later, I was encouraged to run for town council but I couldn't win an election against someone who was born here, regardless of issues or qualifications. However, I realized that, in elections in my hometown, very few people would have voted for someone who ran for political office a few years after moving to town and even if they were there for twenty years, most people would be more likely to vote for someone who they were related to, or went to school with. Yeah, it doesn't seem fair, and it hurts, but it is to be expected. In Maine, it's easier to win a state-wide office than a local office if you're "from away."

    Nevertheless, I have made friends here. Not so many now as a decade ago, when I was more active in the community, but I probably have as many people coming by to visit as I would have had if I had remained in my hometown. People are friendly enough. My hometown has changed a lot, and Millinocket is changing, particularly since so many of those who were born and raised here can no longer find work here.

    But it's not unreasonable to expect people in a small town to favor those who they are familiar with. I still prefer them to large cities, where no one knows anyone.
     
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  10. Chrissy Cross

    Chrissy Cross Veteran Member
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    I never felt that way, guess places are different as are people.

    I lived in a small town in a different country and I was warmly welcomed..they couldn't do enough to be nice to me.

    Invited me to their homes for meals ...even when they barely had money to feed themselves.

    I used outhouses there on many occasions. Didn't make a big deal of it.
     
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  11. Cody Fousnaugh

    Cody Fousnaugh Veteran Member
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    Where we are looking to move, there are plenty of Seniors. I had a resident, who lives there, tell me that. It’s unreal just how many Seniors do live in “snow” areas, like Ken and like it.

    There are just things that even Seniors can’t worry about, in order to live somewhere they’d be happy. Anyway, we are only 70, not 80 yet. An 80 year old would say we are still young. One told us that here.

    If something was to happen to me (death), wife would simply move back to So Calif to her sisters place.
     
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  12. Chrissy Cross

    Chrissy Cross Veteran Member
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    I can't picture you in Maine really because it's mainly a Democratic state and you aren't. Is your area Republican?

    I know California is democrat but Fresno and some other towns in Central CA are Republican...I know my neighborhood is by the signs when it's voting time....

    I do see you as more of a small town type though.

    I'm really actually neither...I can live anywhere...I live in my own world, lol.
     
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  13. Cody Fousnaugh

    Cody Fousnaugh Veteran Member
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    Yes, places are as different as people can be.

    Montana people don’t like seeing California plates and will leave a note on the vehicle stating that. I got one of those notes because my truck had a California plate on it. “Either get a Montana plate or get your a** back to California.” the note read. Luckily, I was leaving Billings the next day.
     
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  14. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Senior Staff
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    Yes, except for a small area in the far north, next to Canada, the northern half of Maine is conservative. Actually, a lot of southern Maine is too, but Portland, Lewiston, Auburn, Bangor, and some of the other cities are very liberal, and that's where the population is.
     
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  15. Chrissy Cross

    Chrissy Cross Veteran Member
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    Well when I worked those states we had rented cars so our plates were of the state we were in @Cody Fousnaugh

    I did like working there....it was beautiful but I do remember driving sometimes 200 miles from one destination to the next with not even a place to stop.

    Idaho,was more populated though, im trying to remember the county we worked in Idaho but I can't. We worked these states in the winter, getting the counties ready for elections.

    I think we flew into Utah and drove to the county in Idaho but I could be wrong. In Wyoming we flew into a small airport in Casper. I do remember that flight. It was like a roller coaster ride and I was scared and the Passengers told me not to,worry, it's typical flying into that airport.
     
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