Thinking About Titanic

Discussion in 'History & Geography' started by Frank Sanoica, Oct 24, 2019.

  1. Frank Sanoica

    Frank Sanoica Veteran Member
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    During construction, a massive engineering feat for the time:

    upload_2019-10-24_9-55-16.png


    Construction of the Titanic started on the last day of March 1909 at the Harland and Wolf shipyard in the Irish city of Belfast, and it would take more than two years. Harland and Wolf had been building ships for the White Star Line for more than four decades. The Olympic vessels, for their part, were the largest ever built at that point.


    Artist's rendition of the stricken ship slipping into the depths, still with over 1,000 souls aboard.
    upload_2019-10-24_9-59-1.png


    Yet, by today's standards, she was small.....
    upload_2019-10-24_10-0-32.png


    Royal Carribean's Oasis of the Seas is FIVE TIMES the size of the Titanic!
    [​IMG]
     
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  2. Beth Gallagher

    Beth Gallagher Veteran Member
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    I've always been fascinated by the Titanic, and I watch all the documentaries about the ship when I find them.
     
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  3. Shirley Martin

    Shirley Martin Veteran Member
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    It was a great movie..... but I didn't like the ending.,
     
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  4. Bess Barber

    Bess Barber Very Well-Known Member
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    NO ONE on the actual trip did either. :D
     
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  5. Craig Swanson

    Craig Swanson Very Well-Known Member
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    This is imo the Titanic disaster depiction that is closest to the actual story. The Brits made it of course.
     
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    Last edited: Oct 25, 2019
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  6. Frank Sanoica

    Frank Sanoica Veteran Member
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    @Craig Swanson

    Greatly enjoyed that, Thank you. Recall seeing it as a kid, just as moving now as it was then. The latest rendition, with today's variety of computer aided scening, cannot hold a candle to the old.
    Frank
     
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  7. Craig Swanson

    Craig Swanson Very Well-Known Member
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    There are certain myths and legends associated with the Titanic disaster. One is that the Titanic was unsinkable. Contrary to popular mythology, Titanic was never described as "unsinkable" either by shipbuilder Harland and Wolff or The White Star Line.

    Some believe that there was another ship, the Norwegian sealer Samson, in the vicinity of Titanic when she sank. Proponents of the theory argue either that the Samson was a third ship in the area that nite, in addition to the Titanic and the Californian, or that the Californian was not near at all and it was the Samson which Titanic passengers spotted in the distance while the ship was sinking.

    Another myth is the hymn played by the Titanic's band as she was sinking. Popular believe was it was the hymn Nearer My God to three. But this has been discounted by at least one person, wireless operator Harold Bride claims it was the then-popular waltz "Songe d'Automne. Bride is one of only two witnesses who were close enough to the band, as he floated off the deck before the ship went down. Some consider his statement to be reliable.

    Another piece of Titanic folklore (or was it) concerns perished first-class passenger William Thomas Stead. According to his account, Stead had foreseen his own death on the Titanic in a vision. This is evidently suggested in two fictional sinking stories, which he penned decades earlier, one of which "From the Old World to the New" (1892) features a White Star Line vessel, Majestic, that rescues survivors of another ship that had collided with an iceberg. Ooh spooky.
     
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    Last edited: Oct 26, 2019
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  8. Yvonne Smith

    Yvonne Smith Greeter
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  9. Cody Fousnaugh

    Cody Fousnaugh Veteran Member
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    We watched this 1997 movie last night on tv and have the DVD of it. Actually, my wife, back in 1997, was a extra in some movies. Her agent called her about being one in this movie, but she knew, most likely, she'd have to be in the water and in Mexico. Mexico was the filming site she was told she be at. She turned down the offer and that ended her "extra" jobs. But, she was in Air Force One and got to see Harrison Ford.
     
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  10. Hal Pollner

    Hal Pollner Very Well-Known Member
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    The TITANIC was a sister-ship to the OLYMPIC, and was built in the Harlan & Wolff shipyard in Belfast Ireland, alongside the OLYMPIC which was launched a year earlier. The TITANIC actually had 2 sister-ships, the OLYMPIC and the BRITTANIC.

    All 3 vessels were exactly the same size and tonnage, with the TITANIC being the more luxuriously outfitted, which gave her a few more tons displacement, due to thicker carpeting and such.

    My mother came to America from the Ukraine aboard the OLYMPIC in 1923 as an 11-year-old girl, with her father.

    The OLYMPIC was broken up for scrap in 1935, and the BRITTANIC was sunk by a mine in WW 2.

    I have 4 films about the TITANIC disaster, one a documentary, with by far the most accurate being the b&w British production:
    "A Night To Remember" in 1958.

    Hal
     
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    Last edited: Jan 1, 2020
  11. Hal Pollner

    Hal Pollner Very Well-Known Member
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    HEY FRANK.....

    In your excellent photo of the Titanic, shown while being built in the shipyards, the name "TITANIC" was not painted on the hull until after the ship was launched and outfitted. The Photographer supplied the name in the darkroom!

    (You can see that the lettering is not perfect...the second T, the A, the N, and the C are all imperfectly formed)

    Hal
     
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    Last edited: Jan 2, 2020

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