University Math Professor Suggests We Should Quit Teaching Because It Perpetuates White Privilege

Discussion in 'Education & Learning' started by Ken Anderson, Jan 3, 2018.

  1. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Greeter
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    A University of Illinois math professor has suggested we quit teaching math in the public schools because it perpetuates white privilege, and is designed to give white people an advantage.

    Source: American Web Media
     
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  2. Frank Sanoica

    Frank Sanoica Veteran Member
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    @Ken Anderson
    One can only wonder whether this fool realizes that anyone mastering Math stands a good chance of gaining privilege? His mind must be a swarm of "unknowns".

    Frank
     
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  3. Bobby Cole

    Bobby Cole Veteran Member
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    Now, if the good professor asked that math not be taught in the private or home sectors then there might be some kind of weird validity to the base statement. Indeed, there are more Caucasians than those of color in private schools. if only by virtue that there are substantially more Caucasians within the total populous of the U.S.A.
    If perhaps she used the private sector within the position she has on the privileged, there might be some idiotic merit to the statement.

    Since government schools have an across the board population in regard to race, how then can she justify her statement? Can the professor's statement be a personal observation that Caucasians are somehow so privileged as to be more intelligent than people of color?

    Now that I have made my own observations based on a single sentence, it might be time that I read the entire statement, although I doubt if I will find anything that might give a little hope for the marginally educated cretin in question.


    Okay, I read the article in it's entirety. Gutierez (spelling) is indeed entitled to her opinion and within that context, so am I but me thinks that I shall endeavor to be a bit more kind than I originally had thoughts of doing by describing her intelligence and reasoning level as inadequate.
     
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  4. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Greeter
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    She seems to be implying that black people aren't smart enough to learn math. That is, I think, the underlying attitude of a lot of what we're hearing lately, particularly from white people who believe they're advocating for black people.

    For example, when you argue that voter ID laws disenfranchise black people, what you saying, if not that black people aren't smart enough to figure out how to get an ID?
     
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  5. Bobby Cole

    Bobby Cole Veteran Member
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    Precisely one of my points.
    if the whole scenario were to be pointed toward a singular student then we could say that that student was lacking the intelligence to perform a particular task or tasks. But, we wouldn't stop teaching the other students for the mental deficiencies of one. (even though the bell curve is a pretty close second to not learning or teaching)
    But when a whole race of people are attached to that same statement then the whole race is deemed to be slower or less intelligent than it's Caucasian counterpart.
    The whole thing does not say a whole lot about those people of color who have excelled in math and other complicated studies but instead gives rise that those who have excelled are doing so by some unmerited favor.
     
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  6. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Greeter
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    Yes, that parallels my other example too. If there is a state office somewhere that refuses to issue identification cards to black people, which is highly unlikely, then we should be dealing with that rather than discarding the reasonable idea of requiring identification.

    What's next? Are we not going to allow anyone to require a high school diploma or a college degree for a job because these requirements give an advantage to one race over another? If there are fewer black people graduating than white people, maybe we should close the schools so that everyone is equally uneducated.

    The black people who I am familiar with, including members of my own family, are every bit as intelligent and capable as anyone else.
     
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  7. Bobby Cole

    Bobby Cole Veteran Member
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    I am beginning to sense an oxymoron type of hypocrisy with the whole "white privilege" arena.

    Self fulfillment is one of the mainstays of all human existence no matter the race. If we say that Black people in general are not comfortable with a higher education and cannot be made content by the learning of it, then the very classroom by itself could be deemed as a sort of oppression.
    On the other hand, if the person of color does not learn, he or she opens themselves up for another, more abrupt type of oppression and will be ruled by those who have a higher learning experience. ( i.e. the Al Sharptons of the world.)

    The same applies to voter I.D. It is taken as being some sort of oppressive state that blacks en masse must face at the hands of their oppressors, the Caucasians. In actuality, for a whole race to accept that they are somehow being extraordinarily put upon by conforming to that which would help them with equality is lunacy at best.

    "Infinitus est numerous stultorum" Infinite is the number of fools.
     
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  8. Bill Boggs

    Bill Boggs Veteran Member
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    I read that and passed it off as some educated kook who has probably drawn a misguided inference from some personal experience she or someone she knew had encountered.
     
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  9. Bobby Cole

    Bobby Cole Veteran Member
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    Which might make one wonder what it was that so influenced the professor to BE a math instructor if it was so difficult for people of color to learn? Or, is she indicating that it is only the black race which cannot fathom the concepts of addition, subtraction, multiplication and division?
    If so, is she then psychologically bowing to some supposed supreme intellect by indicating that Caucasians are more mentally acute in academia?

    To me, it is like telling the lead in a race to stop racing because those who follow cannot keep up or cannot run at all.
     
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  10. Bill Boggs

    Bill Boggs Veteran Member
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    Well yes it is or telling those lagging behind there is no use racing because it is rigged against you; someone else is going to win. Everything today is seen as white privileges it seems. Of course that merely myopinion.
     
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  11. Martin Alonzo

    Martin Alonzo Veteran Member
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    Some of these teacher/professors going out of their way to show their insanity.
     
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  12. Frank Sanoica

    Frank Sanoica Veteran Member
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    "Equally Un-educated". Interesting and thought-provoking phrase. Akin to "Developmentally Challenged" if a kid is shorter than average height, or "Mechanically Challenged" when my car takes a "dump" along the roadside.

    "Prophetically-denied". My own term used in summation of it all.
    Frank
     
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  13. Gloria Mitchell

    Gloria Mitchell Very Well-Known Member
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    Yeeep, too much dope doings, have fried their brains :D
     
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  14. Babs Hunt

    Babs Hunt Veteran Member
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    When I read the News article I knew I would find that the Teacher was not talking about regular "math" such as addition, subtraction, division, and multiplying. Caucasians and many other races graduate from High School and College not being able to do these things to balance check books, pay bills, etc.

    As far as these other maths that are not necessary to everyday normal lives for the most part...my opinion is there is some truth to what the teacher says...but that truth should extent to every race and not just the blacks.

    Where we differ is that I don't think these "other maths" should be mandatory for all students...whereas what I call "everyday math" such as addition, etc. should be. The "other maths" should be offered and even be mandatory to the fields that such math is needed in such as Chemists, Doctors, Scientists, Biologists, etc.

    Where the Teacher is definitely wrong in my opinion is to not include all races in her opinion and to basically say that all math should not be taught.

    Part of the problem with education now days is that teaching needs to go back to the basics of reading, writing, arithmetic, spelling, grammer, etc. Many students now days graduate without knowing the basics of any of these subjects.

    Maybe this Teacher should not be teaching math instead of saying math should not be taught.
     
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  15. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Greeter
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    Why bring race into it at all? Given that race was the focus of her article, the point that she was making, without intending to, was that she doesn't believe that black people are as capable of learning as white people, or that white people have an advantage.

    I am white, and I have the DNA test to prove it, yet I had difficulty in both of the algebra classes that I took in high school, and algebra does have real-world applications, and I was even more lost in geometry, and dropped out of trigonometry after the second day.

    However someone might view their own racial thoughts, whenever you assume that one race is more capable than the other, you are being racist. In some cases, you might even be correct, but you are still being racist. Liberals like to think that they are exempt from that label even as their assumptions are racist.
     
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    Last edited: Jan 5, 2018
  16. Bobby Cole

    Bobby Cole Veteran Member
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    One particular valid point you have made is that she pointed out a particular race rather than making an over the board statement.

    As to the rest, we do indeed have a problem (several actually) with government education in that they are enforcing conceptual learning instead of foundational learning at the early levels.
    As a student grows to the upper levels when they are supposed to be in some college preparatory curriculum, they are instead still trying to bang out the basics.

    Black, White, or indifferent, there are very few who can build a house from the roof down and to build a whole skyscraper starting from the top to the bottom is impossible.
     
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  17. Bobby Cole

    Bobby Cole Veteran Member
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    The whole scenario does bring up a bit of angst because although I do not feel myself to be a defeatist, I cannot fathom anything that I can do to change anything. It is a foreign world to me in that those who are in a guidance position are more like educated Morlocks readying their followers, the Eloi, by teaching them to learn only the sound of the horn. Like Pavlov's dogs or mice in a maze, those who are willing only abide well when they are being mechanically tuned by some dubious hierarchy and there is absolutely nothing I can do about it in my life time.

    When did the search for excellence become a journey too difficult for the masses and when did mediocrity replace virtuosity and when did ignorance become so comfortable?
    At some point, everything changed and changed so dramatically and devastatingly that as an earthquake leaves a chasm in it's wake, it was there and there is virtually nothing that can be done to stop it from growing into an abyss of ignorance.
    What can I do? Pray I guess because no matter how much I try to teach, write and sometimes scream, it seems that the alternative is more alluring.
     
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  18. Frank Sanoica

    Frank Sanoica Veteran Member
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    @Ken Anderson
    Dropped out of Trigonometry? How could you! One of my most favorite endeavors in the realm of Math, as it's so very basic and useful! Ah, well, I know Math "ain't for everyone". In high school, for me, Trig was not easy. The basic concepts applied to triangles were straightforward enough, but those absurd "identities" thrown at us were absolutely bewildering!

    Who could have predicted that, my having Trig in 1960, might "repercuss" back in 2002, 40+ years later, when I was called upon to teach it to a classroom of small-town Missouri high school seniors? Believe it or not, I "saw-through" then, many of the pitfalls which blocked my understanding of it all at 18, as these kids were now, and was determined to explain to them the very quirks which prevented my understanding when I was their age. They picked up on it!

    Reflecting upon this, I wonder now, today, what proportion of young adults are even exposed to traditional Math aspects. Computer mechanisms now set up and solve those problems which were practical to use of Trigonometry back then.
    Frank
     
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  19. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Greeter
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    Despite two years of algebra in high school, with reasonably good grades, I just didn't get it. On test days, I had to quickly write as many of the formulas in the margins as I could before I forgot them, which occurred because I didn't understand anything about it.

    Twenty years later, I realized that the drug calculations that I was teaching to my paramedic students was algebra. I still had to refresh myself on it each year before I taught another pharmacology course. Then, when the technical institute I was teaching for became a college, I was able to farm some of our coursework out. I had gotten to know a woman who had been teaching a business math course, and she agreed to tailor her course for my students.

    She came up with a way of doing drug calculations that was much simpler than the methods shown in any of the four paramedic textbooks that were out at the time, doing the math by percentages, and it was way easier. The other advantage was that I could see a real-world use for it, although in practice we rarely had to do any such calculations.

    Several years later, the paramedic textbooks began including that method of doing drug calculations.
     
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  20. Bobby Cole

    Bobby Cole Veteran Member
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    If math teachers and students recognized that math is nothing more than a language of its own, I feel that both would be the better for it because it is indeed, a language.
     
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  21. Frank Sanoica

    Frank Sanoica Veteran Member
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    @Ken Anderson You then can appreciate this point: Often the question of splitting a tablet in two in order to secure two half-doses of medication, comes up. Understanding that the whole dose may be 1 or 2 milligrams, small as a grain of salt, the tablet itself must be large enough to deal with physically, maybe having an overall weight of 1000 mg. So, if that speck of medication is simply thrown in somewhere, and the tablet sliced in two, odds are the whole speck is contained in one piece, with only filler present in the other. If the speck is "homogenized" into the tablet uniformly, then splitting it results in 50-50 distribution.

    Best advice I've heard on this came from a Pharmacist: If a tablet is lined, it is uniformly mixed, and may be split in two. No line, don't split.
    Frank
     
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  22. Kitty Carmel

    Kitty Carmel Very Well-Known Member
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    Nailed it! This is just what I was thinking. I only scanned the article because frankly it's offensive. I'm liberal but these nutty liberal SJW types have lost their minds. And that's what a lot of them sound like: "I'm this cool liberal white person speaking for the black people who aren't able to speak for themselves. What would they do without me? I'm so enlightened" Ah no your not. Your an idiot.

    Article didn't mention all those Asians who have been kicking academic ass for years. Though I have also read in SJW circles, Asians are now considered like whites as too many have become too successful and that just won't do.

    People can be smart and they can be dumb. I've wondered if people can march in the streets thousands at a time and bring in all the money that BLM has, can't they do something to get food sources into food deserts and make other community improvements. I think they can.
     
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  23. Tim Burr

    Tim Burr Very Well-Known Member
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    A solution to the problem might be to have everyone
    with a smartphone, get the app 'PhotoMath'.

    Take a picture of the math problem and it will give you the
    answer and a step-by-step guide of how each problem is solved.

    No longer will you have to worry about those pesky formulas
    or even to think. Just know how to download an app, which
    any 4 year old knows.

    Problem solved...
     
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  24. Frank Sanoica

    Frank Sanoica Veteran Member
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    @Tim Burr
    And new problem develops? Gradual diminishment of gray-matter ability to do work anymore which it formerly performed easily. Might this lead to total reliance on the new technology for everything, like remembering to breathe?
    Frank
     
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  25. Tim Burr

    Tim Burr Very Well-Known Member
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    @Frank Sanoica I'm not very good at sarcasm, my humble attempt.

    I was thinking back to when I took the Stationary Engineer
    and Boiler Inspector Exam to get my License.

    Lots of formulas to remember and I studied like a mad man...
    Made my own 'flash' cards and carried them and had people ask
    me questions.

    Was very proud when I scored well and got my license.

    Now there are a lot of 'short cuts', but does that help
    society to 'Dumb Down' the way knowledge is obtained?

    I see workers who are unprepared for even the simplest task.
    They can't follow the 'chain of events' that lead to proper
    troubleshooting a problem.

    Our everyday equipment is getting more complex, but it's getting
    harder to find people who want to spend the time required to
    learn how to repair them.

    I foresee more problems in this area as time goes by...
     
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