Cat Health

Discussion in 'Pets & Critters' started by Janice Martin, Mar 27, 2017.

  1. Janice Martin

    Janice Martin Well-Known Member
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    My cat is a part-Maine Coon, spayed female, around 11 yrs old.
    By city law, cats are required to have licenses, and rabies vaccines are required in order to get licenses.

    What do you make of this?: when she was weighed, it turned out she lost a little more than one pound since her last appointment two years ago. Vet insists this would only happen if kitty had a serious thyroid condition. She says kitty needs a battery of tests- expensive bloodwork coming to nearly $200, not counting appointment fee, examination fee, etc.
    While I was surprised to learn she'd lost any weight, I don't think it should be cause for concern. There have been no changes in her health, activity levels, eating habits, etc.

    This vet seems to have a habit of pushing unnecessary procedures and products that the cats do not need (mine, my neighbor's, and two other people). She's also very condescending and belligerent.
    I certainly want kitty to be healthy, but I don't think there is any legitimate reason for the bloodwork just because she lost a little over a pound.

    I thought I'd pop in here and ask what you think.
     
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  2. Babs Hunt

    Babs Hunt Veteran Member
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    I think that she's your cat and if you feel this bloodwork, etc. is unnecessary at this time then you should just tell your Vet that you just want to monitor this situation at this time.
     
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  3. Missy Lee

    Missy Lee Well-Known Member
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    I don't want to alarm you Janice but there are underlying conditions in our senior cats that can only be found through bloodwork.

    In addition to overactive thryroid, diabetes comes to mind. But personally I don't think a pound should prompt these expensive tests as there could be another reason.

    We recently lost one of our cats and the other lost almost two pounds as he spent weeks wandering and searching for his pal. Our vet knew this and suggested we wait a few months to test.
     
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