Trees And Other Things

Discussion in 'Personal Diaries' started by Nancy Hart, Jun 21, 2018.

  1. Joe Riley

    Joe Riley Veteran Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2015
    Messages:
    9,703
    Likes Received:
    15,128
  2. Nancy Hart

    Nancy Hart Very Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2018
    Messages:
    4,200
    Likes Received:
    7,894
    I knew they had to be good for something.

    trees squirrels.jpg
     
    #947
    Joe Riley likes this.
  3. Nancy Hart

    Nancy Hart Very Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2018
    Messages:
    4,200
    Likes Received:
    7,894
    It was raining this morning, but it stopped and dried out enough by late afternoon to try cutting some more red tips. I've been saving the ones that will definitely come down on the university's fence until last. Those are also the biggest ones. They are really hard to drag off that fence.

    When I cut the one connected to the "dangler" both came down with all the vines connecting them on the other side of the fence. These are heavier than they look in the picture. I can't budge them, but they didn't damage the fence.

    [​IMG]

    After nibbling around on them I now have two teeter-totterers. One on the left is almost perfectly balanced, and the other is tangled in the university's Leyland cypress tree.

    [​IMG]

    Plan B is to wait until after hours (Friday if it doesn't rain), cut them close to the fence, sneak around to that parking lot and hope I can get the tops down and into the truck quickly. I'd like to avoid the campus police making their rounds. They might think I'm strange. :p

    This job is much harder than I thought it would be. :rolleyes:
     
    #948
  4. Pam Sellers

    Pam Sellers Active Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2018
    Messages:
    108
    Likes Received:
    165
     
    #949
  5. Pam Sellers

    Pam Sellers Active Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2018
    Messages:
    108
    Likes Received:
    165
    Girl, you be careful! Atleast there is not a home game this weekend! Son and grandson are headed to TN for the opening game. We will be watching from home. Go Dawgs!
     
    #950
    Nancy Hart likes this.
  6. Nancy Hart

    Nancy Hart Very Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2018
    Messages:
    4,200
    Likes Received:
    7,894
    Oh yes, Pam. Here we go again! They should be able to handle Vanderbilt, right? I hope we don't have to play Alabama this year. That parking lot is a designated tailgating lot during home games, but pretty quiet otherwise. :p

    I got the second of those two red tips off the fence just this afternoon. Not as hard as I thought it would be, and I was able to sneak in, grab the trees, and sneak out with no one noticing. :) Miscounted before. There are still 4 more to go. One of those will also fall on the fence. :rolleyes: , possibly 2.

    What have you been up to? It cooled off just a little bit here. Much better.
     
    #951
    Joe Riley likes this.
  7. Pam Sellers

    Pam Sellers Active Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2018
    Messages:
    108
    Likes Received:
    165
    Nancy, I have been outside late in the evenings pulling weeds and picking up all the hickory nuts that are falling! UGH! I gotta call the tree company and have them cut down these two hickory trees. With all these nuts that are falling this year....we may have a hard winter this year. I tend to judge the seasons by how the squirrels hide nuts and the size of the acorns.
     
    #952
    Nancy Hart and Frank Sanoica like this.
  8. Nancy Hart

    Nancy Hart Very Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2018
    Messages:
    4,200
    Likes Received:
    7,894
    I brought a hickory tree in from the farm and planted it in town years ago. It was a nice tree, then about 20 years later, it decided to produce nuts. It must be 50 feet tall now. Too late. The nuts are huge things you can't mow over. But the trees have deep roots, and turn a pretty yellow in the fall.
     
    #953
    Frank Sanoica likes this.
  9. Frank Sanoica

    Frank Sanoica Veteran Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2016
    Messages:
    7,921
    Likes Received:
    8,065
    @Nancy Hart
    We had Pignut Hickories in Missouri:

    "Pignut Hickory
    Family: Juglandaceae
    Carya glabra

    Description: Hickories have a similar looking fruit, where its shell is split into typically 4 slices that eventually break apart to reveal a nut. The Pignut Hickory in particular has a thinner shell. The tree grows to full size of 18-24 m (60-80 feet).

    Leaves: The leaves are pinnately compound and for the most part have 5 leaflets.

    Habitat: According to The Audubon Society Field Guide, Pignut Hickories grow in "dry or moist uplands."

    Location: The only Pignut Hickory I've seen on campus is along the path from the Castle to the Science buildings.

    Use: The nuts can be eaten raw, though they might be bitter. The nut can also be candied, crushed into flour, or boiled to separate the oil. The Hickory sap can be used for syrup, made into sugar, or used for its water."

    The pignuts are not as readily edible as some other Hickory nuts, which long ago provided a staple for the Algonquin Indians. Frank
     
    #954
    Nancy Hart likes this.
  10. Nancy Hart

    Nancy Hart Very Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2018
    Messages:
    4,200
    Likes Received:
    7,894
    @Frank Sanoica

    Thank you, Frank. Had to follow up on it. It says Pignut hickory nuts are large. Mine are small, about an inch with a very thick shell and small kernels. More likely a Mockernut hickory (Carya tomentosa). The tree bark rules out some of the other hickories.

    "The name Mockernut refers to the rather small kernels of its nuts, despite the large size of its fruits. This is the result of the somewhat thick husks of the fruits and the very thick shells of the nuts. The thick shells of these nuts make them difficult to crack open.

    Mockernut Hickory produces separate male and female flowers on the same tree. The female flowers give way to fruits, but only after the tree reaches about 25 years old. The second blooming season should yield nuts, but they will not be edible. The third through seventh seasons will produce usable nuts and then a one- to two-year dormancy will occur."


    There is also a hickory near the driveway that started out as a sapling, which I tried to kill several times, but I grew to admire it's persistence and let it grow. It also started producing a couple of years ago. When you drive over the nuts they pop like firecrackers.

    How to crack hickory nuts

     
    #955
    Frank Sanoica likes this.
  11. Joe Riley

    Joe Riley Veteran Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2015
    Messages:
    9,703
    Likes Received:
    15,128
    [​IMG]
     
    #956
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2019
    Nancy Hart likes this.
  12. Nancy Hart

    Nancy Hart Very Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2018
    Messages:
    4,200
    Likes Received:
    7,894
    Another thread reminded me of my very first dentist, so I Googled him, just to test my memory. I distinctly remember when he said there was no need to fill any cavities in my primary teeth because they would just fall out anyway.. Yes! . He later reminded me of Ben Casey. Dr. Suso lived to age 90 and died in 2014.

    [​IMG]
     
    #957
    Joe Riley and Frank Sanoica like this.
  13. Nancy Hart

    Nancy Hart Very Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2018
    Messages:
    4,200
    Likes Received:
    7,894
    This should have been in the last post, for dramatic effect, but it was too late to edit when I found it. My favorite TV program 1961-1966. Still remember this part after 50 years. lol

     
    #958
  14. Nancy Hart

    Nancy Hart Very Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2018
    Messages:
    4,200
    Likes Received:
    7,894
    Update on red tips ...

    Got two big ones down today without too much trouble. Only one remaining, in the left corner. It is very wide at the base and tangled in vines at the top.

    [​IMG]

    I cut the bottom 5 feet, or more, off of each one, because they were too heavy to drag up to the driveway otherwise. Will cut the stumps off at the ground later. I need to sharpen the chain first, or get a new one.

    The plan is to drive the truck down there and load this heavy stuff when all the cutting is done. Should have made a neat pile. Loading the truck tomorrow with the 2 cut today, to haul off Friday.

    [​IMG]

    I like this job. It is a one time thing, takes no talent, just patience, but every day you can see a little bit of progress. If I were working with someone they would want to rush and get it over with. To do what, instead?
     
    #959
    Last edited: Sep 4, 2019
  15. Joe Riley

    Joe Riley Veteran Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2015
    Messages:
    9,703
    Likes Received:
    15,128
    Its always good to work with someone, when using a chainsaw.
    [​IMG]
     
    #960

Share This Page