What Is This Weed?

Discussion in 'Crops & Gardens' started by Ken Anderson, May 23, 2016.

  1. Babs Hunt

    Babs Hunt Veteran Member
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    If you can keep it contained in the area you want it...then there should be no problem. :)
     
    #16
  2. Corie Henson

    Corie Henson Very Well-Known Member
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    I think that is the same weed that is growing in our extended garden that we usually eradicate by pulling the roots when they are young. When fully grown, the small branches are tough so we need a cutter or a bolo to chop it. They have no use for us except for the goats. However, it can be a good decoration for the garden if you would care to give it a regular trimming. The shape of the small leaves are nice to look at. Unfortunately, we don't have a name for it.
     
    #17
    Last edited: Jun 2, 2016
  3. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Greeter
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    Okay, next question. Although I don't think this plant looks like a weed, it's not something that we planted, at least not here, growing among our onions. It may be a plant that the squirrels relocated because, in return for food throughout the year, our squirrels have offered their landscaping and garden planning services, and often decide that a bulb plant might look better in a location other than where we planted it. A couple of roses turned up amongst our beans last year, but its in their nature for wild roses to move around. That's awfully kind of them but I do wish they'd consult with us first. Anyhow, this doesn't look like a weed but I know we didn't plant it among the onions. The leaves are velvety and the stems are reddish in color. So far, it hasn't flowered and we didn't plant any non-vegetables that wouldn't flower.

    mystery1plant.jpg mystery2plant.jpg mystery3plant.jpg mystery4plant.jpg mystery5plant.jpg
     
    #18
  4. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Greeter
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    This is the same plant that I asked about last year. It survived the winter and was still green when the snow melted away from it. Now that it has grown, I can see that it's a vine. The leaves and stems are velvety, I think that's the term - fuzzy. It just showed up in our garden last year. I let it live, so it has gotten bigger this year.

    070117-UNKNOWNPLANT.jpg
     
    #19
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  5. Yvonne Smith

    Yvonne Smith Greeter
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    I have been puzzling about this strange vine, and searched for any description that I thought might bring up a picture of it. The closest picture I found was this bit of vine. If this is it, you have some kind of a hardy kiwi. Maybe one of your neighbors has one and the squirrels or birds ate some of the fruit ? Otherwise, it is not apt to just sprout up because they are certainly not native.
    If it is a kiwi, it might grow for a few years before you see anything on it, similar to a grape vine.
    Please keep us updated with pictures as it grows !

    IMG_0653.JPG
     
    #20
  6. Gloria Mitchell

    Gloria Mitchell Very Well-Known Member
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    #21
  7. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Greeter
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    Yeah, I have been ripping the poison ivy out of the ground for a few years now but it's hard to eradicate. Fortunately, I don't react to poison ivy so I can putt it up with my hands.

    No, it doesn't look like that.
    velvet-leaf-senna.jpg
     
    #22
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2017
  8. Kalvin Mitnic

    Kalvin Mitnic Well-Known Member
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    If you cant smoke it or make brownies sorry, I don't care...;)
     
    #23
  9. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Greeter
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    As for the barberry, I decided to let it live. I think it looks kind of pretty, so I left it. I did have to remove it from another part of the yard, though.

    I have another one. I found some of these growing out at the town compost area a few years ago, and kind of liked it, knowing or suspecting that it was a weed. I planted it in our front garden and now we have several of them. They are nearing the end of their flowering period here, but they flower when the other perennials have dropped their blooms, and I kind of like the wild, otherworldly look of them. The bees like them, too. I don't know what they are, though.

    2019-08-06 16.15.48.jpg 2019-08-06 16.15.52 HDR.jpg 2019-08-06 16.15.31.jpg 2019-08-06 16.15.52.jpg
     
    #24
  10. Bess Barber

    Bess Barber Very Well-Known Member
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    purple-bee-balm-400x266.jpg
    @Ken Anderson

    Is this the same thing.? It's called a Bee Balm plant. I know nothing about plants, found it on google.
     
    #25
  11. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Greeter
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    That looks exactly like it. From the name, I guess that's why the bees like it so much. Thanks.
     
    #26
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