Bootleggers, Moonshiners, And Prohibition

Discussion in 'History & Geography' started by Nancy Hart, Nov 27, 2018.

  1. Joe Riley

    Joe Riley Supreme Member
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  2. Joe Riley

    Joe Riley Supreme Member
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  3. Marie Mallery

    Marie Mallery Veteran Member
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    I was wondering when the south would come up,lol.

    Southern moonshiners were the ones to inspire or start Nascar Racing. They had the hot rods for hauling moonshine.
     
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  4. Marie Mallery

    Marie Mallery Veteran Member
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    :D
     
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  5. Joe Riley

    Joe Riley Supreme Member
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  6. Joe Riley

    Joe Riley Supreme Member
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    US bootleggers are making a comeback
    New Hampshire has become a hub for the illicit alcohol trade (2018)
    [​IMG]


    Prohibition in the US may have ended in December 1933, but the bootleggers are back.
    "In the 1920s, illicit alcohol was smuggled into the US from Canada. Now the source is New Hampshire, where prices in state-run liquor stores are considerably lower than in neighbouring states."

    "Many of the liquor stores are close to the state line and they offer rich pickings to modern-day smugglers who are buying vast quantities of alcohol and selling it on at a considerable profit on the black market."

    "Alcohol is big business in New Hampshire where the state has a monopoly on hard liquor sales and also accounts for 70 per cent of the wine market."

    "Being able to buy in bulk gives the state purchasing power which enables it to undercut its neighbours. Not levying sales tax makes alcohol even more competitive."

    "According to the latest figures, New Hampshire raises $700 million a year in sales from its 79 liquor stores, with $160 million going to the state treasury."


    New Hampshire’s Liquor Commission defended its handling of the trade.
    “The New Hampshire Liquor Commission is committed to following state and federal laws and we have an 85-year track record of doing just that,” a spokesman said.

    “There’s nothing illegal or unscrupulous about making large sales to out of state customers as long as our employees follow our comprehensive training and the policies in place set forth by the state and federal government.

    “Our employees will not be put in the position of questioning each out of state customer to determine what they will do with their purchased product.

    “It is the individual customer's responsibility to comply with their local laws if they bring that alcohol home with them.” (READ MORE)
     
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  7. Nancy Hart

    Nancy Hart Veteran Member
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    A History of Alcohol in New Hampshire

    "Did you know Portsmouth, NH, was once home to one of the largest breweries in the country? Or that beer was once considered safer to drink than water? New Hampshire's relationship with alcohol is explored, from the Prohibition Days, when rum runners made secret trips on the Seacoast, to the first State run liquor stores in the 1930's." .. LINK TO VIDEO

    Before Prohibition, ... "Men who worked hard said that rum would fortify them. On special community projects, like building a community house or raising of a barn, it became part of a ritual to have rum brought to workers. They would drink while framing the barn or the house."

    Unidentified New Hampshire man helping to raise a barn before Prohibition

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