Question About Car Tires

Discussion in 'Shopping & Sales' started by Shirley Martin, Mar 7, 2019.

  1. Beth Gallagher

    Beth Gallagher Supreme Member
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    Shirley--I have always heard that passenger car tires are good for at least 10 years before they age out. Check the manufacturer's website for the brand of tires on your car to see what they recommend. (Don't ask a tire retailer or dealership... they want to sell tires.)
     
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  2. Shirley Martin

    Shirley Martin Supreme Member
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    Thanks for the info, @Frank Sanoica . Now what tires should I buy? :rolleyes:
     
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  3. Jerry Adams

    Jerry Adams Veteran Member
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    lots of info by google "manufacture date of tires" also suggests a six year shelf life.
    How to find the DOT number on your tires
    If you look closely at the side of each of your tires, you'll see a bunch of letters and numbers. While this may just look like a confusing jumble, it's actually useful info. Look for a number that starts with the letters “DOT,” followed by a series of 10-12 characters. This code, which is required by the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT), will tell you several things:

    • Week, year, and place of manufacture
    • Tire size
    • Manufacturer's unique code
     
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  4. Shirley Martin

    Shirley Martin Supreme Member
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    They have been on my car for seven years. When I'm not driving the car, it is parked under the carport, out of the weather. So they should be all right then?
     
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  5. Joe Riley

    Joe Riley Supreme Member
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    Shirl, Googling doesn't always guarantee correct or up to date information. You need to ask ask a human bean that you know and trust ( mechanic or garage) Follow their advice....check back in six years!;)
    [​IMG]
     
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  6. Shirley Martin

    Shirley Martin Supreme Member
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    Thanks, @Joe Riley. I'll do that. I could get my son to look at them but he wouldn't be able to see the inside of the tires. My mechanic can put it up on the rack and get a good look at them...…. I think.
     
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  7. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Senior Staff
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    I'm not an expert on tires but, while I wouldn't ignore the advice of someone in a dealership, since they would probably know more about the quality of the tires they sell than I would, at the same time I'd be aware that a dealership might also have an incentive to sell a brand that they might be overstocked in, or which they can earn a larger profit from; employees, probably not so much. I don't know if they're paid by the hour or on commission, as that might make a difference. Not everyone is wholly directed by profit, however. I'm sure there are plenty of honest tire dealers, but picking the right one could be a challenge. Or you could simply buy a well-respected name brand, which would probably be one of the more expensive ones and hope for the best. A couple of times, I have walked into a tire dealership looking for a specific brand of tire and, both times, they didn't have any of that brand to fit my car, so I just buy tires now, and couldn't even tell you which brand I have.
     
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  8. Shirley Martin

    Shirley Martin Supreme Member
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    I don't know what brand I have on my car, either, @Ken Anderson . But they don't ride smoothly. I have never been really happy with them. I have been too stingy to replace them before now. If I have to replace them, I want some that give the smoothest ride.
     
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  9. Don Alaska

    Don Alaska Supreme Member
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    Bumpy ride,@Shirley Martin? It could be one or more broken belts, which should be covered by a tire warranty, although at 7 years, I am not sure.
     
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  10. Frank Sanoica

    Frank Sanoica Supreme Member
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    @Shirley Martin
    The question's answer depends on the make, model, year, and type of usage expected. Look on the driver's door inner edge, or door jamb, a tiny label should be there advising the tire size recommended (and the car's electronics are calibrated for). If your car is VERY old, no such label will be found. That began in maybe the 1980s.

    Armed with that label's info, ask a tire man to show you his wares in that size, showing prices. It's amazing how widely priced a given tire size will be: based on number and type of plies, speed rating, and tread wear ratings. You can compare those ratings yourself, if examples of each tire are in front of you. They are imprinted right on the sidewalls, both sides. No responsible tire-seller should balk at this request. Take a pad of paper with you, write 'em down, then compare prices.

    The cheapest tires will fall apart quickly. Also, beware that today's "globalization" has resulted in big-name branding being used on tires manufactured all over the world. The absolute worst tires I ever had were made in Israel. They were also the cheapest available.
    Frank
     
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