Word Origins

Discussion in 'Evolution of Language' started by Ken Anderson, Jan 22, 2015.

  1. Yvonne Smith

    Yvonne Smith Senior Staff
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  2. Bess Barber

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  3. Jerry Adams

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    Cute

    Now I know I'm getting old. It took a second look and a minute for this to come through.
     
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  4. Yvonne Smith

    Yvonne Smith Senior Staff
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  5. Sam Calabria

    Sam Calabria Well-Known Member
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    While this historical piece recounts the origins of music, it gives great insight into how words themselves, were first formed...

    From the great historian of ancient man, Melvin Brooks...

     
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  6. Dwight Ward

    Dwight Ward Veteran Member
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    I had forgotten all this and looked it up again.

    Sunday and Monday are named after the celestrial bodies, Sun and Moon, but the other days are named after Norse gods; Tyrs's day, (W)odin's day, Thor's day and Frigg's day.

    Saturday does not follow the same pattern, and the name actually means 'hot water day', which can be translated as 'washing day' or 'bathing day'.

    The English 'Saturday' originates from the Roman god Saturn, and can be recognized from Latin, where the day is called 'Dies Saturni'.

    I guess it used to be the custom or practice to bathe only once a week. The lowest classes probably didn't even reach this plateau. No wonder that the common crowd at Shakespeare's plays were called 'stinkards'.
     
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  7. John Brunner

    John Brunner Senior Staff
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    Aren't weddings held in June because May was Bath Month?
     
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  8. John Brunner

    John Brunner Senior Staff
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    Originally posted by @Yvonne Smith

    [​IMG]

    This is also where "Boston [pork] butt" comes from. In New England, less desirable cuts of the pig--like the shoulder--were put into barrels [butts] and shipped elsewhere for sale.
     
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  9. Dwight Ward

    Dwight Ward Veteran Member
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    So .... if an Imperial gallon is about 8.33 lbs. a butt weighs around 897 and 2/3 lbs.

    RhinoButt.gif

    That's a big-ass butt.
     
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  10. John Brunner

    John Brunner Senior Staff
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    Southern cookin' will do that...bless your heart.
     
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