Where You Live

Discussion in 'Places I Have Lived' started by Cody Fousnaugh, May 8, 2022.

  1. Ed Wilson

    Ed Wilson Veteran Member
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    I live in the same area where I grew up. The service took me to a large part of the N.E. U.S., Greenland, Europe and North Africa so I got travel out of my system. I was able to find good work here which helped. If you live in the same place where you grew up, you can't help but be "in tune" with your neighbors because you share a lot. Newcomers are changing the people landscape though, so I'm not sure I care for that.
     
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  2. Don Alaska

    Don Alaska Supreme Member
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    My brother lives in PA too, @Ed Wilson. Other than the Air Force, he lives 7 miles from where we grew up. He didn't even vacation until he retired.
     
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  3. Mary Stetler

    Mary Stetler Veteran Member
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    Not moving!!!
    Eventually they will find two mummified bodies in our house, which will still need to be vacuumed and dusted.:rolleyes:
     
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  4. Cody Fousnaugh

    Cody Fousnaugh Supreme Member
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    In red above is exactly what was happening in Loveland, CO where we lived before and the older Seniors didn't like it at all. And, we can see the same complaints here in Henderson due to So. California's "working class" young folks moving in. But, unfortunately, nothing can be done about it.
     
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  5. Beth Gallagher

    Beth Gallagher Supreme Member
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    But... when you moved there, YOU were the newcomers causing resentment.
     
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  6. Faye Fox

    Faye Fox Veteran Member
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    Are you being evicted?
     
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  7. Faye Fox

    Faye Fox Veteran Member
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    You might want to rethink about moving to the Reno area if the young Californians are a problem. Reno and the area, is the hot spot for spoiled San Francisco young folks with inherited bank accounts to move. They are moving there at an alarming high number to escape the mess they and their folks created in San Francisco. I would think southern Calif working young folks are a better breed than the Golden Gate tofu loving brats.

    Have you ever visited or studied out the Boise, Idaho area? It checks all your boxes. Not one or two, but all your boxes. With surrounding towns, Nampa, Caldwell, Weiser, etc., it fits your population requirement.

    It has lots of western wear shopping

    It has western themed pancake houses

    Cowboy steak houses

    Has a good VA hospital and system

    It has PRCA Rodeo and western living is everywhere

    Lakes and rivers great for boating, fishing, white water rafting, or photography

    Wildlife abounds and it is only a short trip to the mountains

    The climate has easier winters than Colorado and cooler summers than Henderson

    Dee and Brenda Pickett live out on an acreage near Nampa.

    Most tattoos seen are patriotic due to a famous patriotic tattoo artist living there

    The National Old Time Fiddlers contest out in Weiser

    The week long Basque Festival

    Country and western dance places galore

    Caldwell night rodeo which is one of the top outdoor rodeos in the USA

    Livestock auctions

    Cowboy hats and boots seen everywhere

    Custom cowboy hat and boot makers

    Saddle and chap makers

    Home to Vernon Lynes spur, buckle, bit maker and silversmith

    Cowboys churches

    Riding and roping clubs

    A custom rope maker both rodeo and ranch

    Western Idaho Fair

    Bo Pickett, Dee's nephew, a tie down roper, is seen more in cargo shorts than in Wranglers

    While the Boise area has an increase in Californians moving in, it is less than Reno by a big margin.
     
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  8. Mary Stetler

    Mary Stetler Veteran Member
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    Oh great! Now I wanna move there.:D
     
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  9. Cody Fousnaugh

    Cody Fousnaugh Supreme Member
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    No Beth, it's the "working class" California folks who are causing the resentment. "Enough is enough" is what some locals have told us, just like when we lived in Loveland, Colorado. IOW, long time residents, especially the Senior ones, don't want their city/town changed.
     
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  10. Cody Fousnaugh

    Cody Fousnaugh Supreme Member
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    Definitely not evicted, but had to sign a 1-Year Lease Agreement. We've never broke a Lease and don't intend to now. So, simply have to put up with what is going on.
     
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  11. Cody Fousnaugh

    Cody Fousnaugh Supreme Member
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    Well, first, we are going to visit both Carson City and Reno to see what we think of both. It is a must however, that we live somewhere where apartments are. And, you do know that Reno has an 8-day $800,000 (or so) rodeo each year?

    There just happens to be certain cities that the "working class" of So California, and other states, are really drawn to. The job market in Reno isn't nearly as good as here in Henderson/Las Vegas metro. And, Carson City is even worse and it's the Capital of Nevada.

    We have to go back into "Old Man Winter", but definitely NOT like we left in Colorado.

    When it comes to Dee Pickett, we met him in Colorado Springs when he was inducted into the Hall of Fame. We met his team roping partner once, Mike Beers, at the old (no longer happening), Wrangler Winter Finals in Las Vegas at the MGM Gardens in June 2001.
     
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  12. John Brunner

    John Brunner Senior Staff
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    That describes my old suburban Virginia neighborhood outside of DC. I lived in the same neighborhood for over 45 years. It went from folks helping each other out to a bunch of idiots who would call the town government if your grass was 1/4" above the legal height.

    I had the last small bungalow in my old neighborhood. All of the rest of the original 1940s homes had been replaced with McMansions. The people who lived across the street from me had 3 kids. Their dad was not mechanically inclined, so I'd work on their bicycles, run a phone line to their bedrooms, let the guy use my truck, stuff like that. I knew them for at least 20 years. When they were selling their house, the Missus told me that my original small house being there depressed the sale price of her home!!! She was actually angry!!!! It's disgusting.
     
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  13. Hedi Mitchell

    Hedi Mitchell Supreme Member
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    Our move to Kansas

    One year ago we made a move from our birthplace of Texas to a small SW Kansas town. In need of a more affordable place to live was the main reason for the move. A relative had made the offer for us to move in a house they owned if we wanted, but it was in Kansas.

    After much decision we packed up and headed to Kansas.

    By the time we got to Kansas the night of 12-12-22 we had been through a massive rain storm, and survived the pitch black darkness of prairie land as a tornado hovered somewhere very close to us. The sirens in the tiny town we were to live,were going off full blast at 10:45 when we pulled up.

    The first three months were somewhat difficult,for various reasons. One,we were not accustomed to snow on a regular basis, winds beyond belief at times, and the fact that the 2 story 105 year old house sat on the corner of the main highway 160. Drafts, hard water that has to be treated, and use of separate spigot for drinking water were the first items to be learned.


    Moving from a town of 120,000 or more to a town of less than 800 is , a big change. It is a friendly town, but as pointed out to me the town is 30 years behind the times. They want cash or checks vs debit or credit cards. There are a few places that take the cards, but the other is preferred. Watch your mouth, as people here are related or born and raised here. Let me just say, this is not the place to get political,for me that is not a problem.

    The town I fear will become stagnant, as they refuse to let outside business move in. They do not want to compete with outside business. Their events they hold lack imagination and creativity.They do not know how to draw attention to their products. There is one red light in town.

    There is no noise around here,with exception of braying donkeys, chickens, cattle moos, and dogs. The vets clinic is right down our street. Oh there is the noise of the 18 wheelers trucking down hwy 160, but that is brief. The highlight of the day is when the sirens go off, volunteer fire, dept. police cars, and road crew of some sort. This happens once a week at least.

    The down side to small town living in the prairie lands, you have to travel everywhere . The nearest big enough grocery store is 55 miles away. The small store in town is higher in prices but often has good sales on some things. If you want a Dollar Tree, a fast food place you must travel at least 25 miles. There are no fast food places here.

    Many kids are home schooled here, there are no actual gas stations here. Gas comes from the feed store down the road. The closest thing to big town living here is the two men who play their auto music way too loud. YoubangieIthump is what we called it at home. LOL one new resident here claimed it was the drug cartel alerting drug dealers. Noo, do not think so.

    I can deal with most of the smaller town issues here, but what I can not wrap my head around is lack of doctors and getting them to stay here,or close by. We have already been through 3 doctors at the clinic and hospital also down the street - in less than a year. No dentists for at least 25 miles.

    I could continue on about the lack of medical here, but would take too long.

    Once or twice a month we travel to the biggest town that has Walmart and a Dillions- part of Kroger. We shop Walmart only because it is one stop shopping for us. It is 55 miles to get there. The first 25 miles is nothing , but mostly open range of cows,horses,some bison and fields of wheat, corn and hay. There is one nice looking small town. The next 25 are a repeat of the first 25, and the continuing plateaus and hills of red dirt. There are the seasonal sunflowers, and a few other unknown flowers along the sides of the road.

    It is peaceful, no red lights, no noise, very few autos,but there are the truckers off and on. In the spring time and summer the ride is beautiful.

    We always get a rotisserie chicken from Walmart on shopping day, We eat that on the way home, yes after we cleanse our hands. The only real traffic is entering the city and leaving, plus there is road work last few months.

    There are some beautiful sunsets, and sun rises here, as there are no buildings here to block the view. Another thing I enjoy is the huge tree in the back yard, the window over my kitchen sink, the full glass front door that was put in when we moved here and the very large window in dining area . Small things,we never had in the city,a yard versus concrete.

    I could ramble on, but you may be bored by now. Bottom line, living here is vastly different from the only way of life we have known. There is much to get use to, they tax everything, but less paperwork. A new resident in a large city fills out many sheets of paper to see a doctor, you get one sheet here.

    Aside from feeling a bit lonely and so far from loved ones, not really knowing anyone here, we are doing okay out here . Financially, um difficult but we are working on the issue. Would we spend so much money to move far from our homeland again? Maybe.
     
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  14. Yvonne Smith

    Yvonne Smith Senior Staff
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    Loved reading your story, @Hedi Mitchell ! A town of only 800 is indeed a small town, and I thought Bonners Ferry (Idaho) was small with around 2500. But I do understand and can relate to much of what you are saying, and (unfortunately) that is what keeps me tied here to Huntsville.
    At our age, having good doctors close by , and available shopping , are important. Bobby and I grumble about going over 3 miles to get anywhere.

    We would both prefer rural living, and being able to have at least a few chickens; but it is just not practical for us, especially me, at this point. As far as living in town, Huntsville is probably as okay as it gets.
    Because of NASA, military, and the arsenal all here (and maybe Space Force headquarters eventually), the economy is good compared to many other places, and we have great doctors and hospitals.
    And most things are fairly affordable here, too.

    I complain that it is too hot and humid half of the year and too cold and dismal the other half; but really, we still have a lot of nice days to enjoy. And if sirens and flashing lights is one of the highlights of the day, we have plenty of that kind of entertainment here in our neighborhood, too. Even the dogs look forward to singing along with the fire engines as they race down the road past our house.

    Bunches of Hispanics have moved here over the last few years, and when you see the local grade school let out, most of the kids we see walking down the street are Hispanic, and probably illegal.
    Even so, they are peaceful neighbors, and it is not them who use all the drugs and cause police problems or think that a speed bump is a roller coaster.

    We moved here to be closer to my daughter, but since she has been in the Netherlands for work the past few years, we seldom see her anymore, and my friend Evelyn moved away to live with her daughter; so I feel isolated here, too, just like you do, Hedi.
     
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  15. Don Alaska

    Don Alaska Supreme Member
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    There are good things and bad things about living anywhere, but you should choose the place that fits you best. I enjoy rural living and couldn't imagine living in town again, although I may get too old to maintain this place eventually. We no longer have livestock, but we did bring a few chickens back on the place during Covid. We already had the facilities and they hadn't yet been repurposed. We are getting more neighbors, so things are getting "civilized. A pastor down the road and his family have been our friends for over 30 years now as they were our only real neighbors when we moved here. We only go "big" shopping once or twice a month, but there are a couple stores nearby where we can get fill-in items.

    I don't know if you are a church-goer, @Hedi Mitchell but that is a good way to become accepted in a small town. If not church, perhaps there are other clubs or organizations you could join to help you "fit in" to small town life. Just imagine what it was like when there was no internet.
     
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